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Only love remains

Thu, Oct 4, 2012

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Most people would say I’m not religious. I’m not spiritually religious, although I exhibit some behaviors in a religious manner. I refer to myself as a free-thinker, a skeptic, and occasionally an indifferent agnostic or a militant atheist. So the apparently spiritual title of this essay would seem out of character for those who know me.

I’ll not wander down the road of knowing me. Even after five decades of study, much of it characterized by the serious introspection allowed those who pursue the life of the mind in the halls of academia, I barely know myself. And I know too little about love. But I’m pretty certain it’s all we have.

I’ve tried turning my back on my own emotions, and those of others. I’ve been a rationalist most of my life, and my entire career was spent as a scientist and teacher. My laser-like focus on reason precluded the expression of feelings, an attitude reinforced by the culture in which I came of age, a culture in which the only thing worse than having feelings was expressing them. For most of my life I’ve been mystified by public displays of affection and people who mourned the loss of individual lives.

After all, as I’ve known for a long time, birth is lethal. Nobody gets out alive, a notion that applies to cultures and species as well as individuals. My perceived lack of empathy led some to conclude I was a sociopath. Or a psychopath. My two-sizes-too-small brain can’t customarily distinguish the two.

Long familiar with his talent as a guitarist, I didn’t think the words of Jimi Hendrix applied to my world: “When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.” Recently I’ve begun to question my earlier sentiments.

Heartbroken, again and again

I keep believing I’ve worked through each of the five Kubler-Ross stages of grief. And then, just when my rational side seems to get the upper hand, I’m overwhelmed again and thrust back to the lobby of my own personal Heartbreak Hotel.

A decade ago, as I was editing a book on climate change, I realized we had triggered events likely to cause human extinction by 2030. Notwithstanding neoconservative talking points (aka lies) to the contrary, burning fossil fuels that accumulated over millions of years within the span of a couple centuries is having expectedly horrific impacts on the environment we share with millions of other species. Recognizing the horrors we’ve triggered, I mourned for months, to the bewilderment of the three people who noticed. Shortly thereafter, I was elated to learn about a hail-Mary pass that just might allow our persistence for a few more generations: Peak oil and its economic consequences might bring the industrial economy to an overdue close, just in time to allow our species to persist beyond another generation.

It’s been a rollercoaster ride since then. Oil priced at $147.27 back in 2008 nearly sent the world’s industrial economy into the abattoir. Close, but no life-ring. Even as increasingly dire data, models, and climate-change assessments roll in, politicians and central bankers have kept the wheels of industry churning. Although we’ve been in the midst of an economic depression for several years, atmospheric carbon dioxide levels keep rising to record-setting levels each year.

Finally, I surrender. We’re done. Homo colossus has tripped several positive-feedback triggers, any one of which leads to near-term human extinction. The combination is truly lethal.

Now what?

I abandoned the luxury-filled, high-pay, low-work position I loved as a tenured full professor to go back to the land. I led by example. Vanishingly few followed. I’m reminded of the prescient words attributed to American existential psychologist Rollo May: “The opposite of courage in our society is not cowardice, it is conformity.”

My new path presented tremendous challenges for a life-long academic who could barely distinguish between a screwdriver and a zucchini. I learned new skills, including rough carpentry, plumbing, masonry, gardening, and animal husbandry. Learning by doing, my naivety produced injuries to my body and my psyche. Even before I broke my ribs and suffered numerous minor scrapes and bruises, most of my colleagues concluded I’d gone insane. This conclusion was shared by many of my friends and family.

I no longer communicate with most of those colleagues, friends, and family. It’s too difficult to justify the occasional conversation.

As an academic conservation biologist, I’ve long recognized that the living planet sustains our species. I was pointing out the dark underbelly of industrial civilization even as we were driving some 200 species to extinction every day. But I was ensconced in the underbelly, too. Living at the apex of empire, a large city in the southwestern United States, meant compartmentalizing my life. Even as I was teaching the horrors of how we live, I kept living in that horrifying manner.

Through years of intrapersonal conflict, love rarely crossed my mind.

The tide rises

I miss teaching, of course. I miss the honors students and inmates with whom I regularly worked. We sought meaningful lives of excellence, and I committed my life to service, primarily to people too-often underserved by an irredeemably corrupt system. Along the way, I learned empathy and love from my students. I suspect some of them learned, too.

But I could not continue to enjoy the city life and face the mirror each day. Such are the hazards of knowledge. Ignorance is bliss but, contrary to the daily choices of the typical American consumer, bliss is overrated.

Eventually, I began to remove the cultural shackles that bound me. Living and working in a sparsely populated rural area these last four years has provided ample time to think, and think deeply, as I have developed new skills and a new perspective. Surrounded by Earth’s bounty and beauty, transformation befell me. Four years after I moved out of Tucson, Arizona, only a few hours in any city induces depression.

Now my wife and I share a small property at the edge of empire with another couple and their young son. We raise chickens and ducks for eggs, and goats provide our milk and cheese. A large orchard complements several large gardens near the off-grid, straw-bale duplex we inhabit. We are committed to working with other members of our human community as we muddle through a future characterized by collapse on all fronts, economic, environmental, and climatic included.

This is not an easy existence, especially relative to my life in the hallowed halls of academia. But it has its own rewards, foremost among them immersion into the real, natural world and an appreciative, loving human community.

The high tide of love

Finally, more than a half-century into a largely unexamined life, I have come to love humanity and the living planet. The wisdom of Jimi Hendrix, long hidden beneath the cultural programming one would expect in the backwoods, redneck logging town of my youth, nags at me.

The living planet and a decent human community sustain each of us, whether we realize it or not. Our years on this most wondrous of planets, regardless how numerous they are, are to be celebrated.

After all, we get to die, and that makes us the lucky ones. It means we get to live.

Our knowledge of DNA informs us that the odds against any one of us being here are greater than the odds against being a particular grain of sand on all the world’s beaches. Indeed, the odds are much greater than that: they exceed the odds of being a single atom plucked from the entire universe. As evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins says, “In the teeth of these stupefying odds it is you and I that are privileged to be here, privileged with eyes to see where we are and brains to wonder why.”

The privilege to be here, on this life-giving planet at this astonishing time in human history, is sufficient to inspire awe in the most uncaring of individuals. At this late juncture in the age of industry, at the dawn of our day on Earth, we still have love: love for each other, love for our children and grandchildren, love for nature. One could argue it is all we have left.

Those who pull the levers in this life-destroying culture care about power to a far greater extent than they care about love. This culture will not know peace. It is much too late for love to extend our run as a culture or a species — too late to employ the wisdom of Jimi Hendrix — but love surely offers redemption to individual humans.

Will we, as individuals, know peace? That’s up to us. I suggest most of us will know peace only when we find ourselves lying helpless in the broken arms of our doomed Earth.

Video version of this essay is embedded below, courtesy of Pauline Schneider. You can support her work here.

Guy: Falling in love again from Pauline Schneider on Vimeo.

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I submitted this essay, upon request, to David Icke’s website. After a few weeks and several inquiries about the status of the essay, I was informed it was not relevant to Icke’s website. I was advised a relevant essay would address “the topic Conspiracy theories controversial news and would include the keyword: Illuminati” (bold in original). I declined the $40 offer and am posting the essay here. Return readers will note redundancy with prior essays in this space.

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This essay is permalinked at Island Breath, Ukiah Blog, Plan B Economics, and Transition Voice.

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I will be presenting a free webinar on Tuesday, 9 October 2012 at 9:00 p.m. Eastern (6:00 p.m. Pacific), Webinar will be hosted by Institute of Ecolonomics. Please register here.

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The latest trailer from Mike Sosebee’s forthcoming film is embedded below. Follow all the updates on Facebook by clicking here.

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I’ll be interviewed next Monday, 8 October at 2:00 p.m. Mountain time by Kevin Barrett. You can listen live here, and I’ll post a link when the show is archived.

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563 Responses to “Only love remains”

  1. KK Says:

    Nice. – KK

  2. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    Nice essay, Guy, it really resonates with me…..although, I’m afraid, our Love will become a Funeral Pyre…but hell (HaHa)….let’s light that fire anyway…nothing left to lose.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqUTxWnPOw4

    Does Icke do Leatherbound Editions like Dark Mountain, I wonder?

    .

  3. Kathy C Says:

    At this late juncture in the age of industry, at the dawn of our day on Earth, we still have love: love for each other, love for our children and grandchildren, love for nature. One could argue it is all we have left.
    YES
    Will we, as individuals, know peace? That’s up to us. I suggest most of us will know peace only when we find ourselves lying helpless in the broken arms of our doomed Earth.
    YES

  4. ulvfugl Says:

    Hahahaha, rejected by David Icke ? That’s funny. You should take it as a great compliment !

    I’ve trawled through his forum, finding wonderful stuff about how the real Paul McCartney was murdered and substituted by a mind-control clone, as proven by many photographs of different McCartney ears. Icke is excellent in a few areas, and full of crap in all the rest, the worst being climate, where he is totally clueless regarding statistics, and tells blatant untruths. I do have some respect for his challenge to the authorities, but, (a bit like Suzuki in previous thread) someone dug up some secretive connections to some extremely dubious funding… I mean, he’s a football player turned celebrity and book author whose main agenda is plugging David Icke…

    Love ? Peace ? Spiritual stuff ? it’s easy when you start to see how it works, via meditation. Breath control can be used to control all the rest of the mind-body, and provides what appears like a miraculous release when first discovered… it’s so easy and obvious, yet so hard to find…

    Fix everything, be totally still and totally empty… what is this ?

    Zen monastery was being attacked by soldiers, killing the monks, the leader of the soldiers confronted the abbot in the centre of the courtyard.

    The abbot commanded the general to tell the soldiers to leave, the general roared at the abbot, ‘Do you realize I can behead you with my sword without batting an eyelid ? The Abbot roared back ‘Do you realize I can let you behead me without batting an eyelid ?’

    The general backed down and the soldiers left…

  5. Arthur Johnson Says:

    Guy McPherson,

    There’s a lot in this essay to unpack here, but first things first.

    I’ve tried turning my back on my own emotions, and those of others. I’ve been a rationalist most of my life, and my entire career was spent as a scientist and teacher. My laser-like focus on reason precluded the expression of feelings, an attitude reinforced by the culture in which I came of age, a culture in which the only thing worse than having feelings was expressing them. For most of my life I’ve been mystified by public displays of affection and people who mourned the loss of individual lives.

    After all, as I’ve known for a long time, birth is lethal. Nobody gets out alive, a notion that applies to cultures and species as well as individuals. My perceived lack of empathy led some to conclude I was a sociopath. Or a psychopath. My two-sizes-too-small brain can’t customarily distinguish the two.

    Hmmmm. Not to pry too deeply, but your self-description suggests the possibility that you may have a mild form of Asperger’s Syndrome. Have you ever bothered to check?

    BTW, as an aside, I agree with ulvfugl. Meditation helps a lot wrt dealing with life.

  6. OzMan Says:

    Guy,
    you would have to be an Aquarian, yes?

  7. Guy McPherson Says:

    ulvfugl and Arthur Johnson, I’ve been meditating regularly for many years. I still don’t sleep. I still suffer because of what’s in my head.

    Arthur Johnson, I haven’t bothered to check about Asperger’s Syndrome, although I almost certainly have PTSD. I suspect those who know me would conclude I have no difficulty interacting “normally” with other human beings. I was an award-winning teacher and researcher for a long time.

    OzMan, I assume you’re referring to an astrological sign. I wasn’t born between 20 January and 18 February. Would you care to guess again? :)

  8. OzMan Says:

    Guy,

    with respect to Arthur Johnson,
    you don’t need to be an Aspergers sufferer,(or be-er), to be thus or thus with the feeling side. It’s just your expression, and it has come it’s course. As you write only love remains.

    Also, I too find cities affect me now. Only stay as long as I have to.

  9. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    I don’t meditate and I sleep just fine. Everybody thinks they have Asperger’s Syndrome these days. I think it has something to do with cultural shifts and the effects of technology on that. If people are exposed to the i-world from a very early age and immerse themselves in it from thereafter, it stands to reason their social skills gained from social interaction are also going to be affected. Sure, they may be social in i-world, but irl, they lack the basics and come off detached, aloof, indifferent, unempathic and unsympathetic. I’m not talking about Guy here, but the younger generation. I have witnessed bragging about having Asperger’s….and in that sense, it becomes an excuse to not even try to be social.

    .

  10. OzMan Says:

    Your gonna make me guess all the way through the signs, serves me right bringin it up. Only one more then I give up
    Virgo?
    But I’m never any good at guessin anyway.

  11. Guy McPherson Says:

    OzMan, I was born 29 February 1960. I celebrated my 13th birthday earlier this year.

  12. Tom Says:

    Geez Guy, i didn’t realize you and i had this “coldness” problem in common. i’d been aloof for far too long myself (through a first marriage and divorse), losing jobs, losing respect for myself, losing a business – all because none of it made any difference to my worldview (that all of this was a GIANT waste of time). The problem was to discover what it was that gave me this impression – and lo and behold, it was the culture i was “indoctrinated” into via school, job, associations, tv, music.

    i went the tai chi, yoga, meditation route at the same time as i began exploring what to do (right livelihood) and decided that at this point the specific job didn’t matter all that much (money was not a concern because early on i realized i’m not ever gonna be “rich” economically anyway) so long as i was committed to do it to the best of my ability and enjoy it (which i do) but that what did matter was getting involved with as much as i can to fight for Mother Earth.

    It’ll be great to go down fighting for Mother Earth. This gives me a sense of purpose and my life a sense of meaning, though i know it’s all in my head (my attitude) and doesn’t matter a whit to anyone else or in the great scheme of things. i’ve become warmer to others over this long trip and mellowed in my cynicism and caustic feelings toward humanity. i really enjoy gardening and just being here now. My entire life has become a vacation. i work a part-time job, barely make ends meet, smile a lot (and feel it), and continue with the relationships that feel good – like making 2 barrels of wine last weekend (and this one too) with my brother, his family and 2 of my 2nd cousins. It’s good to laugh (through your heartbreak) and “do stuff” rather than sitting around wondering how much longer we have. i’m just living everyday in this circus waiting for the collapse that’ll happen all of a sudden someday (probably within a few years) and want to enjoy as much time as i have left.

    All the best to everyone here, whose comments and links i truly enjoy. Hell, i even liked the arguing! You people are wonderful. i feel so lucky to have found this site of kindred spirits, most of the time trying to help each other out with good suggestions, counterpoint, humor (love those limericks), gardening, science, poetry, questioning and rebuttal.

    Keep on keepin’ on Guy!

  13. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    Guy, I’m guessing you were Born Under A Bad Sign…just like me.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhIGpLylH-c&feature=related

    .

  14. ulvfugl Says:

    “ulvfugl and Arthur Johnson, I’ve been meditating regularly for many years. I still don’t sleep. I still suffer because of what’s in my head.”

    I hate the idea of pathologising one’s experience with some sort of medical label.

    Meditation isn’t an anaesthetic. If what we believe to be happening, or anyway, what I believe to be happening, the death of the biosphere, this is the WORST thing that could possibly happen…

    We just are not equipped for horror of such magnitude…

    You know, the death of one beloved child is a life-scarring event, but the death of 100 unknown children somewhere else is just a statistic… we simply are not built to magnify up the grief over on child time a 100 or a 1000 or 10,000… our emotional machinery doesn’t have that sort of capacity…

    None of the great spiritual leaders from all the cultures of the world have ever had to confront a crisis of this magnitude… it’s like we all get to be crucified by it, if we care…

  15. Thrivalista Says:

    Beautifully poignant, and oddly satisfying, Guy, thanks.

    Love,

    T~

  16. OzMan Says:

    So you are the fishes, now we are making sense, real sense. One would not want to generalise, so I wont, but all I will say on camera is it take one to know one.
    Off camera, well see.

  17. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    In The End, there’s only Love
    Forget that so-called God above
    When the taps run dry
    Let’s all High-Five
    Then it’s time to release the Dove

    .

  18. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    So you are the fishes

    He may be a fish, but I sure as hell hope he doesn’t sleep with them…..maybe it’s a good thing he can’t sleep.

    .

  19. Kathy C Says:

    Arthur you wrote “Hmmmm. Not to pry too deeply, but your self-description suggests the possibility that you may have a mild form of Asperger’s Syndrome. Have you ever bothered to check?”

    I think it is a form of courtesy to not try to diagnose anyone on blogs. You do not have enough information. I find that whenever someone has tried to diagnose me (you say thus and so because of your family or religious history etc.) they have no clue and it usually comes at the end of an argument when they have nothing more useful to say so they make it personal to try to make points, or in this case perhaps to avoid talking about the reality that Guy has so bravely faced and named.

  20. OzMan Says:

    Guy

    Can you elaborate on the headaches? Insomnia too?
    What age did it begin? I’m not going to do TRDH’s work for him, just interested.

  21. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    I know one thing that all of us have, and it’s fatal and incurable. It’s called Civilization. Diagnosis Murder.

    .

  22. Guy McPherson Says:

    No headaches of significance, until the cluster headaches began in about middle age (inherited, no doubt, from my father). Insomnia since August 1979, as I’ve described previously in this space (most recently, here).

  23. ulvfugl Says:

    Aah, the Unconscious mind can be manifested symbolically as the sea, the ocean, so dive in, become fish, become ocean, and go to the bottom of the deepest ocean trench and hover there, safe, unknowable, untouchable, whatever happens above… that’s the shamanic flight, like the shamans say they can travel to the Moon or the Sun and look back at all life on Earth from that perspective… there body becomes molten, flesh torn away from bones, brain sandblasted out of the skull, and nothing remains… it takes courage to be a shaman, the toughest job anyone ever had…. hurl yourself into the flames and keep on going….

    Hendrix understood that, his grandma was Cherokee, he could go to Mars and look back at all this…. the guitar talks about the journey…

    My cluster headaches are about 8 every twenty four hours, the effing medication is useless, I burn in Hell for an hour at a time, I have no choice but to leave my body, and find refuge elsewhere, the deepest ocean is a good place for that, dark, cold, relief of nothingness… strange squirmy things will survive whatever humans do to the planet…

    Then it’s over and I’m reborn back here… exhausted… drained… what else can I do but laugh, trying to understand it is pointless…

    Waiting for the effing doctor to phone me back and try some other chemicals…

  24. DaveF Says:

    Guy,

    Thanks for this post, beautifully expressed and heartfelt too. Others may dismiss it as depressive gloom and doom, but I don’t see it like that. What depresses me is the widespread denial and superficial optimism as to the true state of this world that I encounter in daily life, both in the flesh and across cyberspace.

    I do of course feel a deep sadness and grief about what our collective presence as a species has done to this incredible, beautiful living planet–which could be the only planet in the universe with complex life on it.

    It is far more healthy for the mind and soul to be cognizant of the reality of our situation, as dire as it may be, than it is to go blissfully into the long dark night of extinction believing all is well up until the moment when it is glaringly obvious to even the most persistent optimist that we are at the end of all things. When the growing and converging crises reach a point that even the most delusional can no longer deny. But then it will be far to late as panic, horror and terrible despair will overwhelm those who hung on to the wistful delusional optimism and believed the B.S. of the powers of this world.

    Now is the time to prepare and find some spiritual/psychological ballast to prepare for the storm that is certainly coming.

    Thanks for continuing to share your lucid observations and insights as to the true state of the world. It is a bit of sober sanity in a world that is descending rapidly into madness.

    Dave

  25. OzMan Says:

    Kathy C

    I go along with that.

    Fishes are usually in shock for the first 45 years or so. It sounds about right that industrial civ FUBARs the internal radar. Time to heal the whole world one needs.
    No one’s pathologising anyone I hope, least of all Guy. What a huge heart the man has.

    Off topic:
    $40 bucks aint much?

  26. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    Then it’s over and I’m reborn back here… exhausted… drained… what else can I do but laugh, trying to understand it is pointless…

    Well, since you believe population overshoot is the problem, as you explicitly noted on the last thread in support of TRDH, you could off yourself and make it one less useless eater. The strength of your convictions, and all that. I’m not saying I want you to do that, but if you believe it as emphatically as you stated it in the last thread, then what’s stopping you, especially when you consider that you’re obviously suffering?

    .

  27. ulvfugl Says:

    $40 bucks aint much?

    I thought that too !

    Jeez, it’s hardly worth one good sentence….

    Nobody ever paid me to write anything. I’d hate it if they did. It’d be ‘work’, and I’d worry if it was good or not…

  28. ulvfugl Says:

    Well, since you believe population overshoot is the problem, as you explicitly noted on the last thread in support of TRDH, you could off yourself and make it one less useless eater. The strength of your convictions, and all that. I’m not saying I want you to do that, but if you believe it as emphatically as you stated it in the last thread, then what’s stopping you, especially when you consider that you’re obviously suffering?

    They call it Suicide Headache, kid, because so many sufferers go that route…

    I can’t go that route because i have a dog and birds that depend upon me, amongst other things…

    And I aint a coward. Every minute is precious. I am not willing to be pushed out of my life by anything, not any degree of pain, until I’m ready, and then, like any good zen master who knows their stuff, I’ll leave at a time of my choice and in my own way….

    I am so fortunate to be blessed by having such an appalling adversary to wrestle with every day….

    That answer satisfy you, clueless one ?

  29. OzMan Says:

    Today’s LOL moment for me:

    ulvfugl

    “I am so fortunate to be blessed by having such an appalling adversary to wrestle with every day…”

    Very dry, and embracing too!

    Guy, don’t forget to pay youself the $40 bucks.

  30. Patricia Says:

    Dear Guy,

    I empathize and can certainly relate to the 5 stages of grief. I mourn for us all.

  31. ulvfugl Says:

    Oh, another thought. Why worry about not sleeping ? I know the orthodoxy amongst medics is that sleep is essential blablabla, but that’s for ‘ordinary’ people… ordinary people don’t get troubled much by the stuff we discuss here, their worries are different…

    There’s ninja and tibetan tantra and other esoteric schools, developed techniques where you don’t sleep at all for very long periods, with no harmful or distressing effect, you use certain meditation techniques, and continue them whether walking, sitting, standing, laying down… the mind uses so little energy it doesn’t get fatigued… I practised that stuff years ago… I forget where I found the best details, I think it was a Shingon Shu teaching, it’s very powerful stuff… don’t know if it’s online anywhere, but these are the guys who know about it…

    http://theindexer.hubpages.com/hub/Fasting-and-meditating-for-100-days-Part-1

  32. Jennifer Hartley Says:

    I love you, Guy.

  33. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    like any good zen master

    If you’re a Zen Master, I’m glad I never pursued it. Crikey, what a philosophy it must be if you’re the shining example.

    Oh, and I don’t think of you as an adversary, but it is interesting that you think of me as one. It that Zen philosophy, I suppose. So full of peace.

    And OzMan, ordinarily I would have given you a response on the Sara Conner question you posed, but my Station Chief wouldn’t approve it. Sorry. Maybe next time…if we’re still breathing that next time.

    .

  34. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    Why worry about not sleeping ?

    I, for one, don’t worry about it, but I do appreciate it, and I’m glad I can sleep. I’m a vivid and prolific dreamer, so sleeping for me is like traveling to other universes and/or dimensions…something my conscious world cannot provide as readily. For that reason, I would certainly be disappointed if I couldn’t sleep.

    .

  35. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    That answer satisfy you, clueless one ?

    It’s precisely what I anticipated your response would be, but I don’t know if I’d call it satisfying. It’s alright if you’re selfish. I mean, over population is the problem, you said it yourself, but you’re not willing to be the example that’s the solution to that problem. Fine, I can accept that. This Zen stuff is some weird shit.

    .

  36. BadlandsAK Says:

    Thank you for illustrating that in a person’s life, there can only be one path. Trying to follow two will tear you apart. I have been there. Indeed, heartbreak, despair, insomnia, PTSD, depression, chronic migraines, all symptoms of being aware.

    To suggest suicide as a cure for the headaches-HA! Every migraine sufferer has already contemplated such, and I feel confident in speaking for the entire group of said sufferers. Cluster headaches are in a league of there own. I highly recommend “Migraine”, by Oliver Sacks, which some here have likely read. It helped me accept the migraines for what they are-an enigma. They are not easier to get through, but I understand that they likely serve a valid purpose.

    I have small children now, so dealing with psychic pain is tricky. My life has become a series of small compromises, some larger than others, I guess. I no longer make art, which rather than being an outlet or release, often amplified my struggle, as it became a wrestling match between my head and heart. When there is more time, I will try again.

    For now, I have to tend to the little ones and help them navigate the world. It is a bittersweet endeavor, because I can see that they are vulnerable to the swirling confusion embodied in everything/everyone, and I don’t know how to protect them from that, as I am overly sensitive to it as well. If anything, they are expert at finding the wonder in everything and doing everything to the extreme. It is hilarious to watch a 1 1/2 yo running around exclaiming, “I did it!”, “I got it!”, and “I win!”. Life is mostly good, if not better than good.

  37. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    To suggest suicide as a cure for the headaches-HA!

    No one did any such thing-HA! Suicide is a cure for the problem of overpopulation, if you believe overpopulation is the problem. Pay closer attention next time, rather than seeing things you want to see that are not actually there.

    .

  38. K Scott Says:

    “I realized we had triggered events likely to cause human extinction by 2030.”

    When I read things like that, it really trips me up. True especially because I have sons that would be 36 and 34 year olds then. Trips me up because with 8 billion people, a whole lot of dieing would have to go on before that. And I think you could be optimistic with your year. My strongest desire is to protect them from whatever bad things are coming their way. Not realistic, but I can at least give them experiences now that they can turn their minds back on in the future. Loving experiences with nature, family, and a handful of close friends. You say “only love remains”, but “it is really all there ever was”.

  39. BadlandsAK Says:

    Help! Where is my sarcasm font?!

    Must feed lunch to the little ones and myself now, which is likely slow homocide/suicide seeing as nothing is safe to eat/drink/breathe. All while having my 5th migraine this week. Life is pain, but I have other responsibilities.

  40. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    They call it Suicide Headache, kid, because so many sufferers go that route…

    There’s that insult of children again. I really hate to see this…not because I feel insulted for it, but because it unnecessarily maligns children. It’s like using women’s female parts as insults…same difference, and it says something about the person who levels it. It’s ironic considering it was leveled by someone who identifies themselves as an Anarchist. Children hold the key…if there is a key…and it would serve us adults well if we emulated them more, rather than less, and it certainly makes no sense to use their good name as an insult.

    http://www.inspiracy.com/black/abolition/abolitionofwork.html

    .

  41. ulvfugl Says:

    You conceited narcisstic fool, MB

    “Oh, and I don’t think of you as an adversary, but it is interesting that you think of me as one. It that Zen philosophy, I suppose. So full of peace.

    You assumed I was talking about YOU ? Vain, self-centred idiot ! I was talking about the ILLNESS I have, where I have to endure, at the moment, about an hour of pain, 10 out of 10 on the pain scale, acknowledged by the medical profession as probably the most painful disease a human being can have, 8 times in 24 hours ! Comparable to giving birth to a baby every couple of hours… and I have to take overdoses medicine which can be lethal, so I risk my life on top of the suffering from the pain….

    And you think I was talking about YOU ? Incredible ! totally amazing. What does that say about your character, eh ? Reflect on that…

    You’re not any kind of adversary to ME, just a confused immature attention seeker who has never gone through a rite of passage to attain adult dignity and self-respect, you feel compelled to shout your mouth off, every opportunity, when you don’t know shit about shit, but you’ll have an opinion with no knowledge to back it up… I have no respect for that ! If you want my respect, you earn it, otherwise you’re just the fly that lands on my hand and is brushed away, no significance…. A twit.

  42. ulvfugl Says:

    I really hate to see this…not because I feel insulted for it, but because it unnecessarily maligns children.

    Oh, ffs, grow up, MB, stop evading your responsibility as a human being, there’s appropriate conduct for kids and there’s appropriate conduct for adults…

  43. ulvfugl Says:

    Pay closer attention next time, rather than seeing things you want to see that are not actually there.

    That’s hysterical ! What bitter irony, spoken by the man who has just assumed everyone thinks he’s so important and central that they simply MUST be referring to HIM… when was talking about my headache… jeez, for shame, show some insight, please, MB, and stop embarrassing yourself with your over inflated ego…

  44. ulvfugl Says:

    Hi BadlandsAK,

    “To suggest suicide as a cure for the headaches-HA! Every migraine sufferer has already contemplated such, and I feel confident in speaking for the entire group of said sufferers. Cluster headaches are in a league of there own. I highly recommend “Migraine”, by Oliver Sacks, which some here have likely read. It helped me accept the migraines for what they are-an enigma. They are not easier to get through, but I understand that they likely serve a valid purpose.”

    Oh MB is just your standard idiot who feels entitled to blurt out whatever comes into his head and thinks the whole world must be hanging on every word… it’s a sort of illness in its own right, and one I’m glad not to have. Pity the poor ignorant wretch and hope he’ll learn wisdom some day ;-)

    Yes, I’m glad you understand something about migraine, according to the neurologist,( who is no great authority on the subject ) I have chronic migraine and chronic Cluster Headache, which is a hard row to hoe… especially for the last few days when the medication stopped working…but hope is on the horizon, following Guy’s suggestion, the doctor is sending Prednisone and considering a list of other suggestions I gave him, so maybe relief is in sight soon :-) It often gets much worse in October, November…

    I have had to give the CH my own version of its meaning and purpose, I’ve had it all my life, just that it got worse and more frequent as I aged, until it’s been every single day for about 10 or 15 years…

    It’s made me very strong ! I’m grateful to have it ! I send some of my power and strength to you, to help you endure ! Blessings !

  45. ulvfugl Says:

    It’s precisely what I anticipated your response would be, but I don’t know if I’d call it satisfying. It’s alright if you’re selfish. I mean, over population is the problem, you said it yourself, but you’re not willing to be the example that’s the solution to that problem. Fine, I can accept that. This Zen stuff is some weird shit.

    It is precisely because you come up with such garbage, and understand nothing, that I call you clueless one, whilst hoping someday you will get a clue…

  46. ulvfugl Says:

    If you’re a Zen Master, I’m glad I never pursued it. Crikey, what a philosophy it must be if you’re the shining example.

    Hahahaha, what an idiot ! First, it’s an anti-philosophy, as I explained to you before, but you’re too thick and conceited to learn anything, Second, where and how would YOU pursue zen ? As usual, you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about, but are compelled to shout your mouth off to the whole world anyway, your jabbering monkey brain cannot help itself…

  47. kevin moore Says:

    I have come to the conclusion that our political leaders, including most district local councillors and senior council officials, are worse than the worst of Nazis: although Nazis did terible things to Jews, Gypsies and political opponents etc., they did at least love their own children. The current crop of politicians and burearocrats apparently don’t even love their own children enough to want to provide them with a future; they are more than happy to see entire communities devasted by debt slavery, huge sectors of the population poisoned and made ill by toxins released by the industrial-military-financial complex, and entusiasticaly promote a system which will render the Earth largely uninhabitable for most vertebrate species in a few decades. I look forward to telling a few of them so.

    When I wrote ‘Burn Baby Burn’ over a decade ago it was to promote informed public debate: there is none. We are now at the point of the Burn baby Burn scenario, burning the next generation’s future. And sill most people don’t know and don’t care.

    I have been absent from this blog for many weeks because I have been busy converting the computer dogits I have into improvements in energy efficiency and food production before ‘the ship goes down’, spending 12 to 18 hours a day, 7 days a week. Not only have I lost the excess weight I was carrying but I have increased my level of fitness and stamina substantially.

    The idea of being fit and healthy by working on the land seems to be an anathema to most people.

    I also conclude that most are going to learn the hard way quite soon.

    Keep at it, Guy. Your efforts are much appreciated by the 0.1%.

  48. ulvfugl Says:

    Okay, excuse me folks, while I suffer another attack, the fifth today, another hour of hell… i’m glad there’s nobody here to see me whimpering and pacing the room sobbing…

    There was an old zen monk from Honshu,
    Whose limericks always stopped at line two…

    Top that, while I’m indisposed, MB.

  49. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    ulvfugl said the following:

    conceited narcisstic fool, Vain, self-centred idiot, confused immature attention seeker, what an idiot, thick and conceited, jabbering monkey brain……and the list goes on and on.

    Convincing case. Very good stuff. Since Love is the thread topic, I do so Love this Zen stuff. Apparently Zen = The Power of Insult. You have proven to be a most worthy Zen Master.

    .

  50. ulvfugl Says:

    Go fuck yourself, Morocco Bama.

  51. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    Top that, while I’m indisposed, MB.

    What’s next, a LiveCam for the audience to keep track of your running illness?

    .

  52. dweebus Says:

    Normally I just lurk in the background and read.

    Guy says love is all that remains. Lierre Keith says love is a verb. What shall we make of that?

    On headaches: I get migraines. Normally it is about once a week although I occasionally go a month or two without a flare-up. Everyone has my sympathy. My sister on the other hand had chronic, constant migraines, every single day. She once went two-weeks straight with one headache and had to be hospitalized. She got a neural implant and has now been headache free for two months. It was extreme, requiring two operations to install the thing and then a third to deal with the complications, but it appears to have worked.

  53. Robin Datta Says:

    Many cluster headache patients have told me of suicidal thoughts at the prospect of more headaches. Unfortunately no medication is uniformly effective preventive treatment. And due to the frequency of episodes in a cluster, narcotic analgesics are problematic as well. Migraines can be just as bad, but every emergency department has its quota of frequent fliers claiming a migraine seeking another fix. It gives a bad name to genuine migraine sufferers.

    Be careful with that knee, Kathy C!

  54. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    I also conclude that most are going to learn the hard way quite soon.

    It will be hard, there’s no doubt about it, but I doubt “that most are going to learn.” Scapegoats will be inculcated and murdered for the severe discomfort that “most” are going to experience.

    .

  55. Kathy C Says:

    This just adds to the dismal projections for the future. Nice, create a potential problem with vulnerable nuclear power plants, and create the technology to deal with problems AFTER they occur.
    Top Nuclear Experts: Technology Doesn’t Yet Exist to Clean Up Fukushima

    http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2012/10/fixing-fukushima-is-beyond-current-technology.html

  56. ulvfugl Says:

    What’s next, a LiveCam for the audience to keep track of your running illness?

    You’re a know-nothing egotistical fool, MB, you resent anyone taking your limelight…

    You dare to talk to me about LOVE ? I’ll give you LOVE, I’ll take all the pain from everyone who ever reads this thread, I’ll take all the pain from the whole 7 billion, all on my head, along with my own, and give you all bliss and joy instead, if it helps anyone anywhere… I’ll happily give my life and burn in hell for eternity if it’d do any good for this Earth, if it helps Guy to sleep, if it helps Badland’s migraines, and dweebus’s, and if it eases the agony of women and children who are traumatised by killing and bombs and bullets and horror… Give me ALL the pain and grief, and replace it with serenity and equanimity and a happy smile…

  57. Kathy C Says:

    K Scott you wrote “Trips me up because with 8 billion people, a whole lot of dieing would have to go on before that”

    The way I deal with that is simply remembering that all those people are going to die anyway because as Guy notes birth is lethal, only those born die, and all who are born die. The difference with the changing scenario is that they are likely to die sooner than expected, in different ways than expected, and not leave progeny. The sooner the dieoff begins the less who have to die, because dieoff will reduce new births. As far as how we die, many in the first world die lingering deaths from cancer and lonely deaths in nursing homes. Many in the third world already starve. Collapse gives us the opportunity to die from bullet to the head or knife in the back when someone comes to take the resources we have stored up for bad times. Scary but quicker than many deaths today.

    Myself, I hope to go early in collapse. No amount of extra time is worth walking over the dead bodies of others.

  58. Kathy C Says:

    Robin, knee is fine now. That is one diagnosis over the web I appreciate :) But I am careful with it, don’t want to go there again.

  59. ulvfugl Says:

    The place was beautiful, deep in the mountains and forest. The course was called Buddha Breath, Buddha Mind and was led by a bald-headed woman. Instead of an orange robe she wore blue jeans and a sweatshirt. She said first we were going to learn how to breathe. I thought, What have I got myself into?

    We spent an hour just breathing in and out, and you know, it turned out to be pretty interesting. When thoughts came up, we were supposed to just nod to them, then let them go and return to our breathing. Thoughts and breathing, thoughts and breathing, and then as I kept doing this, I noticed something more, some part of me that I hadn’t known before, that was watching all this going on, a quiet, wise old part who was just looking at it all and nodding OK. He’d been doing that all along without my knowing it. I thought of him as an old guy with a white beard. But he was me, that was my Buddha mind.

    http://www.countercurrents.org/hathaway041012.htm

  60. Constance Says:

    Love is what’s left? Or maybe it’s the only constant?

  61. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    I’ll give you LOVE

    My Gawd, is this an Alternate Reality Game, cuz if it’s not, this is insane. If you’re an example of Love, Sweet Mother of Jesus, save us all. Please, keep your Love if that’s Love, I don’t want any of that. I guess I’m not very Loving.

    In the final analysis, I don’t think many people are all that loving, and I think the word is ambiguous, misunderstood and bandied about much too liberally.

    Tom’s post was a loving post, and I appreciated it.

    .

  62. ulvfugl Says:

    “My Gawd, is this an Alternate Reality Game, cuz if it’s not, this is insane. If you’re an example of Love, Sweet Mother of Jesus, save us all. Please, keep your Love if that’s Love, I don’t want any of that. I guess I’m not very Loving.

    Love is not what YOU think it is… I’ve yet to notice that YOU know anything about anything, let alone any insight into love.

    Sweet Mother of Jesus indeed… what a telling remark that is… says a lot about your cultural conditioning, considering you more or less told me to go and kill myself, Santa Muerte would be more appropriate, go ahead, blaspheme her name as you just did the Mother of Jesus…

    http://www.brujonegrobrujeria.com/page/page/2215114.htm

  63. Kathy C Says:

    Let me clarify my comments on diagnosing over the web. I have shared some of my family history and my journey away from religion. Several times people have pointed to that and said or implied that the abuse in my home or my bad experiences with religion are responsible for my (false) beliefs. It always seemed to me that those comments came out after I had made some rather good points and my open sharing was used to discount my ideas and beliefs.

    I felt like the comment about Guy having Asperger’s syndrome was perhaps a bit of the same sort – rather than deal with the truth of his words an attempt is made to find something that might explain away that truth. I perhaps judged the comment too harshly. However I myself have similar feelings of being mystified at the emotions others express that I do not feel. It didn’t make me a sociopath, it made me a very good Hospice volunteer for I could be there at the end of life for someone, become attached, and be sad but not overly upset when they died. In fact I find that too often overly emotive people lack real caring. I don’t cry when pets die, but I take a whole lot better care of them when they are alive than some of the highly emotive people I know. I also have never made a pet suffer a long painful dying because I didn’t want them to die when a needle from the vet could give them a quick release.

    Just watched the movie My Name is Kahn – a really lovely movie http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1188996/ about a man with Asperger’s – watch the movie and you will see that Guy is a long way matching that diagnosis.

  64. Kathy C Says:

    Asperger syndrome (AS), also known as Asperger’s syndrome or Asperger disorder, is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that is characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction, alongside restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. It differs from other autism spectrum disorders by its relative preservation of linguistic and cognitive development. Although not required for diagnosis, physical clumsiness and atypical use of language are frequently reported.[1][2]

    There is also an excellent movie about Temple Grandin (by the same name) per wiki “Temple Grandin (born August 29, 1947) is an American doctor of animal science and professor at Colorado State University, bestselling author, and consultant to the livestock industry on animal behavior. As a person with high-functioning autism, Grandin is also noted for her work in autism advocacy and is the inventor of the squeeze machine, designed to calm hypersensitive people.

    The subject of an award-winning biographical film, Temple Grandin, in 2010, she was listed in the Time 100 list of the 100 most influential people in the world in the “Heroes” category.[1]”

    There are also a bunch of youtubes with the real Temple Grandin on the web. She is an amazing woman and the movie does a very good job of telling her story. Here is one speech by her http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoNErsJNPzw&feature=related

  65. Guy McPherson Says:

    kramertech’s comment on the previous essay, here, seems relevant to this thread, too. Of particular note: “Instead of intelligent discussion …, it has devolved into petty arguments, insults, and commenters veering way off topic. But that’s the Internet for you.”

  66. ulvfugl Says:

    I think a much better model for this piece quoted below, and of Guy’s self analysis, is the left brain/right brain thing. Left brain is great for logic and reason, but useless for love and empathy. There’s techniques for moving one to the other, and for integrating them into a more harmonious relationship.

    This power of the heart is what is specifically designated by the word himma, a word whose content is best suggested by the Greek word, enthymesis, which signifies the act of meditating, conceiving, imagining, projecting, ardently desiring–in other words, of having (something) present in the thymos, which is vital force, soul, heart, intention, thought, desire…(Henry Corbin, qtd. in The Thought of the Heart and the Soul of the World, by James Hillman, p. 5).
    It is this power of the heart, this intuitive thinking, that is in reverential awe of Nature, and is in touch with spirituality and mysticism. It is this mode of thought that brings forth wondrous symphonies, poetry, art, and literature that deepens our awareness of Soul; and it is this mode of thought that will save our world.

    Souls think because Souls are bodies and bodies are Souls. Soul is not located in any separate part of the body, as Descartes believed (the pineal gland). Soul and body are one undifferentiated mode of Being.

    We need to restore this animaterialist mode of thinking. Our world is in dire need of it. James Hillman wrote,
    …philosophy begins in a philos arising in the heart of our blood, together with the lion, the wound, and the rose. If we would recover the imaginal we must first recover its organ, the heart, and its kind of philosophy The Thought of the Heart and the Soul of the World, by James Hillman, p. 6).
    Let us develop this mode of thinking in ourselves. The more of us that do so, the better chance our world has of surviving.

    http://www.soulspelunker.com/2012/10/animaterialist-thinking.html

  67. ulvfugl Says:

    “But that’s the Internet for you.”

    That’s human beings for you. I think we have to accept them for what they are, warts and all, no exclusivity.
    This arose on the DM Unciv forum. Some people want to consider themselves superior, a class above. I don’t think that can work. I want to talk to everyone, including the demons and hungry ghosts, feet in the muck, head in the stars….

  68. dweebus Says:

    ulvfugl-

    Crucifixion indeed. I think any sane person would take the deal. Take it all on if it could spare creation. The shit of it is, of course, we cant. We just get to watch as the train we’re on flies off into the abyss.

    For those who believe in that sort of thing, this deal was already done once. I guess our culture rejected the offer and the moral teachings of compassion, moderation, justice, and love that went along with it, just as they rejected those same lessons from other traditions. And so here we are, when it could have been different.

    BTW how are the rheas?

    -D

  69. Robin Datta Says:

    Stinking more when stirred
    The humanure bucket
    Left still to fill will compost

  70. Martin Knight Says:

    You’re really dishing it out, ulvfugl. I think you could show a little more sensitivity given the nature of Guy’s post. Also, that remark you made on the last thread about Jung being a sort-of Nazi was highly irresponsible. He was nothing of the kind.

  71. ulvfugl Says:

    Sorry if you’re offended, Martin, you seem like a nice enough person, but I can’t go along with this ‘politeness’ and ‘restraint’ stuff. We’re talking about the death of everybody, Global Death, Extinction, you expect me to be dispassionate and show good manners ? Sorry, I don’t think that is appropriate, it’d be like ‘Arbeit Macht Frei’, a gross deceitful hypocrisy…

    Have you actually read up on the case against Jung ? The argument has been very bitter and acrimonious, that’s for sure, but nobody can deny the debate has taken place, which ever side you support…

    Though the field of psychoanalysis was dominated at the time by Jewish practitioners, and Jung had many friends and respected colleagues who were Jewish, a shadow hung over Jung’s career due to allegations that he was a Nazi sympathizer. Jung was editor of the Zentralblatt fŸr Psychotherapie, a publication that eventually endorsed Mein Kampf as required reading for all psychoanalysts. Jung claimed this was done to save psychoanalysis and preserve it during the war, believing that psychoanalysis would not otherwise survive because the Nazis considered it to be a “Jewish science”. He also claimed he did it with the help and support of his Jewish friends and colleagues. This after-the-fact explanation, however, has been strongly challenged on the basis of available documents. The question remains unresolved.

    http://www.crystalinks.com/jung.html

  72. wildwoman Says:

    Hi everyone,

    Long time lurker, first time poster. I check you out multiple times a day, reading every comment. I feel like I know you people. If you want to know anything about me, check out www. Igotsomethin.wordpress.com.

    Love is something I really struggle with, as in love of humanity. We’ve totally screwed up the planet, killing everything in our wake. So no, I don’t love people as a whole. I love individuals very much. I love wild things. I love our domesticated animals. But people? I think the coming extinction is a good thing. It’s only downside is that we take everything else alive with us.

    And, Guy, I know you don’t think you’ve had much impact, but you certainly have in our household. If nothing else, this here is a community.

    wildwoman

  73. Martin Knight Says:

    You don’t have to be defensive, ulvfugl. It’s just that someone who only a moment ago quoted James Hillman and who otherwise seems well versed in Jungian thought could have done better than perpetuate the misunderstanding. You are quite correct that Jung’s supposed sympathies with Nazism was bound up with the idea of psychoanalysis being a Jewish science and that makes things very difficult. But you are mistaken that Jung endorsed Mein Kampf. That came about because Goring took the liberty of adding Jung’s name, without his permission, to the document proffering Mein Kampf as required reading for psychoanalysts.

  74. ulvfugl Says:

    Hi dweebus, nice to see you around… hope you’re coping…

    BTW how are the rheas?

    Last two died this week, they were old… so that’s the end of that chapter… one less reason for me not to commit suicide, eh…

    I’m truly sorry if I offend people, but I have this gripe, I just cannot stand any more of the ‘polite gentlemanly good manners crap’ that is so important to Kingsnorth, Hine, Monbiot, Goldsmith, etc. I find it nauseating. It’s like we can witness the utmost horror and obscene depravity and it’s all okay just as long as we keep a stiff upper lip, suppress our emotions, and behave courteously…

    No.

    Love and RAGE ! Dammit.

  75. ulvfugl Says:

    Fair enough, Martin. I studied Jung for many years before I came across that stuff, then I had to decide if I cared, if it mattered. I don’t think it does, personally. Same as for Heidegger. Nazi Germany was extremely complex and to overlook that and jump to simplistic conclusions is to do everyone involved an injustice. I have to say, he did have the option to leave and disassociate himself completely.

    Actually, my main criticism of Jung is something entirely different, that he was cowardly, because when some wild African dancing was going on, he held back, terrified he might lose control and be drawn into something wild and uncivilised that he didn’t understand… I know from personal experience, how to throw away all caution and trust the Universe. People who don’t know how to do that are simply not in my league.

  76. Ivy Mike Says:

    This song, What is Love?, is dedicated to David Icke for rejecting Guy’s essay on the subject.

    And, yes, life is a killer, especially in these prison walls of agricultural city-Statism (civilization.)

  77. ulvfugl Says:

    Hi wildwoman, I can’t access your site. GoDaddy is dodgy, disreputable, no ? They ripped off my credit card details once, and refused to assist in any way.

  78. wildwoman Says:

    Ok, I’m tech impaired. Try http://Igotsomethin.wordpress.com

    If that doesn’t work, I don’t know what to say. Is WordPress a godaddy site? Ick.

    wildwoman

  79. BadlandsAK Says:

    Well, leave it to a 4 year old to strike up a conversation on the metaphysical on the way to preschool.
    Him: Why can’t you see your own face?
    Me: Oh. You mean with your eyes?
    Him: Yes. How come I can see you, but I can’t see myself?
    Me, rushing to get babies/toddlers out of carseats, and him to class on time: Well,…(the saying “we are looking for our head with our head” comes to mind) I guess because you are there and looking out into the world, hmmm…(trailing off)

    I have what you call mommy brain.
    #1 it turns your mind all mushy and
    #2 though it would seem otherwise, it actually allows one to turn off the emotional faucet, meaning, when I feel like I could drown in the amount of suffering in the world, I’m able to take myself out of the equation in order to function for the sake of the little ones. I guess that doesn’t make sense. I used to allow myself to reach a point of hopelessness and despair, to the point where I was frozen, unable to take any action.

    A good example is watching my son go into anaphylactic shock. I am able to step back, assess the situation, make a decision to use the epi-pen, and go into action. The mom part of me that has watched him nearly die & that wants to panic has to step aside.
    So I guess my point is that I’ve had to harden myself just enough in order to be of any use. When I allow the whole picture in at once, it is overwhelming.

    Thank you for your kind words, ulvfugl. I think the migraines are cyclical and the weather seems to be a major factor. It was 90 on Tues and 45 w/high winds yesterday. Sorry you have to suffer with the cluster headaches. I would be interested in hearing how the prednisone does. My son & I have both had to use it for asthma, but I’ve not heard it mentioned for migraine prevention.

  80. anubis bard Says:

    Guy,

    The asters are in bloom here, and will blossom until the frosts come. The bees and wasps are busy taking the nectar into their winter plans. Their huntress, the phoebe, who should have left by now behind the swallows, is still here, flicking her tail upon a naked maple branch. As though she has a premonition that winter isn’t coming.

    peace,

    Anubis Bard

  81. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    kramertech’s comment on the previous essay, here, seems relevant to this thread, too. Of particular note: “Instead of intelligent discussion …, it has devolved into petty arguments, insults, and commenters veering way off topic. But that’s the Internet for you.”

    I know I never insulted Dane, and was quite cordial and courteous with him. He never once responded to any of my inquiries…not once. I consider that rude and evasive. I also consider it rude and insulting that kramertech claims to have read the thread, yet posts things that have been rebutted as though they were never mentioned. I attempted to bring that thread back to center several times, but Dane didn’t reply, and no one else jumped in to discuss what I had deposited. Thanks to Martin for noticing and thanking me for the link I found.

    I do agree that the thread veered wildly off topic, but my experience here from the very beginning has been that. And yes, I do my part in that…usually commenting on something someone else commented on that was off topic, but to be honest, my first essay posted here was rife with off-topic comments and I didn’t feel slighted. Even you posted off-topic comments to that thread, Guy, and yes, I know, it’s your blog and you can do as you wish, but I’m just saying, that’s what happens here in Blog Anarchy Land.

    And for the record, I never called anyone a name in this thread. My initial point that a certain someone took as an insult was just that, a point.

    .

  82. ulvfugl Says:

    Got it now, wildwoman, seems good…

    No, WordPress is okay, but can be run on different servers… my browser gave me a warning and refused to connect me, showing a red danger thing with GoDaddy on it,
    I’ve read a lot of bad stuff about sites that GoDaddy hosts, they seem to have a policy to take anyones money, for frauds and scams, and then fight off the consequences with a heavy legal department, my bank refunded my losses from someone stealing my card details from a GoDaddy site. GoDaddy just told me to f*** off. Whether the bank had any success getting money from them, I don’t know

  83. ulvfugl Says:

    badlands : “So I guess my point is that I’ve had to harden myself just enough in order to be of any use. When I allow the whole picture in at once, it is overwhelming.”

    I think it is very hard to deal with. I once met a nurse type person whose speciality was attending critical emergencies, with bits of people laying around, kind of thing… she explained how she kept calm and focussed.. but I think I’d be hopeless, just one such scene would haunt me… she had great pride in her work and skill, she’d have a couple of minutes to decide how to keep someone alive, or give up and attend to someone else… heck, just thinking about it freaks me out :-)

  84. Morocco Bama Says:

    .

    This song, What is Love?, is dedicated to David Icke for rejecting Guy’s essay on the subject.

    That is freakin hilarious, Ivy Mike. :-) That’s worse than Chinese Water Torture. I bet that’s what they’re doing to those poor sots in Guantanamo. Well, that, and some of this.

    Some will rationalize the above method as motivated out of a Love for their fellow countrymen.

    .

  85. Mary Logan Says:

    Good one, Guy. Science without love and passion is the pursuit of technology for the sake of . . . ? This one’s for you.

  86. Martin Knight Says:

    I am not nice, ulvfugl, as Robin Datta will attest. I have been beastly to him in the past, because I suspected him of hypocrisy. But Robin is a very elegant gentleman and possessed of a preternatural intelligence. He can be a bit obscurantist at times, the bastard. Only joking.

  87. ulvfugl Says:

    Martin I am not nice, ulvfugl, as Robin Datta will attest.

    Good ! ;-)

    Robin Datta knows that if he says one wrong word, I will surely eat him, dead or alive ;-)

    Namaste ;-)

  88. ulvfugl Says:

    And for the record, I never called anyone a name in this thread. My initial point that a certain someone took as an insult was just that, a point.

    Address me directly please, I dislike these oblique passive-aggressive side swipes, MB

    You posted Hendrix’s Born under a bad sign, and for that I can forgive your thinly disguised wish that i should f**k off and die… and some of your other indiscretions…

    Hendrix grandma, i believe was Cherokee, I checked out their music, I found a CD by an old Cherokee guy, I think in the Smoky Mountains in Carolina ( I don’t know USA well ) and I bought his handmade CD, it had banjo riffs, that Hendrix used, but it was old Cherokee medicine stuff. This old guy had learned old Cherokee shaman stuff, and was trying to teach youngsters who weren’t much interested, he was hidden away deep in the mountains, long way from anywhere. He had some real power alright, he’s probably dead now, it was a long time ago.

    Pura Fe does some great Indian music,IMO.

  89. John Day Says:

    Well, I might try to explore the use of the term “love”, but there seems to be a call to explore the concept of “self”.
    I’d like to explain more, but “I” don’t exist as such, therefore “I” am trapped in something like the Epimenides Paradox.
    As soon as the concept of “I”, and indeed, we can see it as a concept, and not an accurate representation of reality, at least as it pertains to “others”, dissolves, the paradox ceases to exist.
    Freedom is the result, so it is said, maybe “love”, to, but without that tricky subject object thing. How to verb without subject and object?
    there are meditative practices of love and compassion without subject and object.
    They cannot be “objectively” studies.
    Aaummm…..

  90. Martin Knight Says:

    I wasn’t aware, ulvfugl, that Jung had held back when confronted with African dance in what you describe. I can’t imagine that Jung was cowardly, though I suppose this is possible, but I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that I’m not greatly impressed with this accusation, especially not in these times, when instances of bravery are routinely called cowardice.

    Jung thought that the only reason that Europeans had made something of themselves was because of the (all-too-brief, we now see) intense discipline they imposed on themselves. Otherwise, said Jung, Europeans were little better than ignorant oafs, for all their Graeco-Roman inheritance.

  91. Kathy C Says:

    Photos: Wildfires Rage In Washington State
    The wildfires raging in Washington have charred 130,000 acres and the weather could make things worse. The fires were among a cluster of blazes raging in the U.S. West.

    http://photos.denverpost.com/2012/10/03/photos-wildfires-rage-in-washington-state/#name%20here

  92. Kathy C Says:

    Wildfires in Washington State
    The summer of 2012 will unfortunately be known as the “Summer of Devastating Western Wildfires” and practically not one state out west was spared. Washington State has been hardest hit of late. This satellite image shows a rash of wildfires currently burning in the middle of the state

    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/fires/main/usa/20120920-wash.html

  93. ulvfugl Says:

    I wasn’t aware, ulvfugl, that Jung had held back when confronted with African dance in what you describe. I can’t imagine that Jung was cowardly, though I suppose this is possible, but I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that I’m not greatly impressed with this accusation, especially not in these times, when instances of bravery are routinely called cowardice.

    I think it was somewhere in Memories, Dreams, Reflections. I gave you my personal assessment. Not sure what you mean about ‘these times…’, but it doesn’t matter, you can take your own view, I’m not interested in trying to persuade anybody. Dogen calls it ‘jumping off the hundred foot pole’. Jung was afraid to take that leap into the dark.

  94. ulvfugl Says:

    “Only you can wake up. The organs of the American Nightmare can’t and won’t do it for you, and this includes the colleges, including, increasingly, the liberal arts ones.
    But of course the fundamental impetus to awaken has to come from outside of the system, which categorically and inherently cannot generate the awareness of its own deathly dreamlikeness, nor the desire to awaken from it. That system includes your own self, your own psyche, your own personal cosmic order. For any of us to recognize or seek anything more and better, it’s necessary for something to enter from the relative “darkness” lying outside that shell of personal identity. We require some sort of extra-cosmic call to a way of being that is better than, or at least different from, our current one, a kind of bolt from beyond that drives home the realization that what we have now may essentially be a good facsimile of hell.”

    http://www.teemingbrain.com/2012/10/04/awake-inside-the-american-nightmare/

  95. Arthur Johnson Says:

    Guy McPherson,

    ulvfugl and Arthur Johnson, I’ve been meditating regularly for many years. I still don’t sleep. I still suffer because of what’s in my head.

    Out of curiosity, have you ever worked with a meditation teacher? The reason I ask is because what you say here suggests that you haven’t stably achieved meditative quiescence, even after many years. Under normal circumstances, quiescence should be achievable after a year of consistent daily practice. A meditation teacher may be able to help you figure out why you’re not achieving that.

    Arthur Johnson, I haven’t bothered to check about Asperger’s Syndrome, although I almost certainly have PTSD. I suspect those who know me would conclude I have no difficulty interacting “normally” with other human beings. I was an award-winning teacher and researcher for a long time.

    I assume the PTSD is a result of your experience with the explosive forest fire when you were 19? As for Asperger’s, in a mild form it often doesn’t interfere much with career success, particularly if attention to detail and a “laser-like focus” are essential to the job. But it can have serious social consequences, particularly when others misread Asperger’s symptoms for “sociopathic/psychopathic insensitivity to other’s feelings”, as can happen.

    More importantly to my mind, have to talked to anyone about the PTSD? Or have you been trying to self-manage it for the past 30 years? Have you every felt that it interfered in any way with your ability to function? Speaking as someone who has had to deal with clinical depression, anxiety, and their social and professional consequences, I know from experience that talking to a counselor or trained psychologist helps a lot.

    I just thought I should give you a different perspective. Well, enough on that. Back to the main content of your essay…

  96. ulvfugl Says:

    Martin, i wouldn’t want to give an impression of discrediting Jung. I got a great deal from him for many years. A friend had his complete works in leather bound editions covering a whole wall of shelves. That was rather a magnificent achievement, and I’d like to honour what he has given us all. But as so often, the 99% that is good gets changed by the 1% where I found the ‘Ah, so that’s as far as he went, and dared go no further’. One could speak of it as mapping the Unconscious, or any of the synonymous terms from the many other traditions. So that was where I left him, and moved on to other teachers with other maps.
    As T. McKenna said, It’s not about how far out you can go, it’s about how far out you can go and still return in a relative sane and coherent state and know where you’ve been.

  97. Tom Says:

    When i was a senior in high school (geez, 48 yrs ago) i wrestled for the school team. i had an undefeated season going into the various meets leading up to the state tournament. i was supposed to “walk through” the competition at the earliest tournaments, and indeed i did very well the first few matches. Come time for the final match in front of parents and friends and i got myself pinned. i was devastated.

    Two years later i’m driving home in the dark from college in the pouring rain and see a guy thumbing a ride. i pull over and he gets in. We start driving and he says “You don’t remember me.” i look over at him – it’s the kid i lost to that night. i couldn’t believe it. He said he lost the very next match and felt bad that it turned out that way. i was so dumbfounded that this could even happen – i actually laughed about it. We talked for about 45 minutes while i navigated us home. When i dropped him off we had gone through to the other side (reminising about our various sports and life experiences) and left it at that. Life can be wondrous at times.

  98. Kathy C Says:

    Guy the collapse you hoped would save us is probably too late – but your prediction for collapse this year may yet come true whether it saves us or not. Never know just what might trigger the whole ponzi to come down…

    Wholesale Gasoline Shortage In California Causes Gas Stations To Shut Down:
    Hoarding Next?
    Submitted by Tyler Durden on 10/04/2012 14:54 -0400
    “The squeeze is on, and people are doing desperate things,” is how one
    independent described the situation in California. As Bloomberg reports, a
    shortage of supply along with drastically higher wholesale prices of gasoline has caused ‘mom-and-pop’ gas stations to close down as their margins are destroyed. Even larger firms, such as CostCo, are closing sites due to the shortages as Los Angeles and San Francisco gas prices jump 30-45c in a few days.

    As one owner noted: “I can get gas, but it’s going to cost me $4.90 a gallon, and I can’t sell it here for $5,” and another added that “we’re going to start shutting pumps Friday, as gas is costing me almost $4.75 a gallon with taxes. There’s no sense in staying open. The profit margins are so low it’s not worth it.
    Rest at

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2012-10-04/wholesale-gasoline-shortage-california-\

    causes-gas-stations-shut-down-hoarding-next


Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. [...] on Nature Bats Last on October 4, [...]

  2. [...] Guest post by Guy McPherson of Nature Bats Last [...]

  3. [...] Love may indeed be all that’s left. And so the fictions we choose are most meaningfully evaluated by how they interact within this period of reprieve. [...]

  4. [...] hair clean. If you don’t wash your hair your follicles can get clogged up with dirt and oil. This is what causes hair loss and can prevent you from growing hair back. You should be sure you don’t over shampoo your [...]

  5. [...] From GUY McPHERSON Nature Bats Last [...]

  6. [...] I did not know about the horrors of empire, I would still be teaching at a university. I would still be drawing a large paycheck doing the [...]

  7. [...] I did not know about the horrors of empire, I would still be teaching at a university. I would still be drawing a large paycheck doing the [...]

  8. [...] So, what now? There are people much more thoughtful and well-educated than me who are articulating responses to this crisis, working through despair towards a response that rejects the mindset and lifestyle which have got us to this point and is congruent with the new values humans will need to embrace. Dr Guy McPherson, who unflinchingly looks climate and economic catastrophe in the eyes, writes in a blog post entitled “only love remains”: [...]

  9. [...] Guy McPherson points out in an essay entitled “Only Love Remains” on Nature Bats Last, “After all, we get to die, and that makes us the lucky ones. It means we get to live.” [...]

  10. […] have already given up. Guy McPherson leads the charge, passionately arguing that hope is dead and only love remains. Avowed Doomers have a head start on the rest of us, because they believed the science from the […]

  11. […] Most people reading this article are not living with hardship even remotely approaching the hell of Auschwitz which Frankl describes. Yet we live daily in the emotional and spiritual hell of empire and the concentration camp of Near-Term Extinction where, as Guy McPherson writes, “Only Love Remains”: […]

  12. […] touches on our own extinction party, with the shindig probably over within a few decades.  [Elsewhere he wrote that he expected our species to be extinct by […]

  13. […] re-orienting or lives. Guy’s conclusion is that one should henceforth resolve to try always to interact with others in a loving manner — a conclusion with which it is difficult to disagree (although it’s certainly possible […]

  14. […] that our species appears headed for extinction currently (by 2040 per John Davies, by 2030 per Guy McPherson), there is no point in even trying to save […]

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