Livestreamed presentation tomorrow night, and a few words about Michael C. Ruppert

Tomorrow I’ll deliver a presentation organized and hosted by Deep Green Resistance. The presentation is scheduled for 8:00 p.m. Eastern time on Wednesday, 16 April 2014. The venue is Casa Puebla, 2710 Broadway, New York, New York. It’ll be livestreamed by Pauline Schneider here.

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Same-day updates: My interview from a few weeks ago with Derrick Jensen has been posted. It’s here.

I was interviewed on the radio today by Gary Null. The result is embedded below, with my voice starting shortly after the 39-minute mark.


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I’ve been asked to comment about the death of my friend and colleague, Michael C. Ruppert. I have little to say beyond the obvious: We lost a great man.

Mike called me Saturday night as I was about to deliver a presentation. He told me he loved me and respected my work. We spoke for only a few minutes. Now I know he was calling to say goodbye.

Mike sought the truth, which made him an enemy of the state. I suspect it greatly shortened his life. Apparently he pulled the trigger, but he was disparaged for a long time and attempts to discredit him surely took their toll.

I miss Mike and his clear, strong voice. I am inspired by his work and his life, and I will strive to reach his high standards with my own work. And I will continue to grieve.

Comments 44

  • I am so shocked to hear of Mike’s passing, by his own hand no less. I know we face challenges that sometimes make suicide seem like the better alternative, yet we soldier on, if not for our own sake, at least for the community of those who share these terrible truths. Mike was such a great inspiration for me, both for his courageous and virtuous accomplishments and for his reminding us of the importance of respecting and reviving the sacred Native traditions. I personally believe that if there is a way, our Native elders are the ones who will show it to us. I wish I could have demonstrated how important his life was to me, a stranger who didn’t know him. I don’t know his reasons or if knowing how much he was respected and loved might have stayed his hand. As Andre Gregory said “…there’s one thing that’s for sure about death: you do it alone…the people around your bed mean nothing, your reviews mean nothing. Whatever it is, you do it alone.”

  • I am so glad to hear you received that call. Peace to you in your grief, and may strength arrive from previously-unknown quarters as your mantle becomes wider and heavier. Thank you for the chance to participate via Livestream. I will make sure to cue up the start time now that both hemispheres have had their time changes for the spring/fall and I will light a candle even though it will be near mid-day here in Australia. Enjoy the surreality that will surely greet you on those grey streets of New York City.

  • @ Guy

    My condolences on the loss of your friend. Such sad news this morning about Michael Ruppert. Take good care everyone.

  • Hope

    I kept hoping for better: instead,
    “Just wait till you’re older,” folks said;
    By now I should know
    Things won’t change, although
    Perhaps they’ll improve once I’m dead.

  • “I’m tired, I’m ready to die. Great, bring it on. I’m not afraid of death at all, it will be a big relief for me, that will be a graduation….god I get out of this god forsaken shithole…that I love more than anything else in the world.”–Michael Ruppert

    It’s easy for us to forget. It’s easier still to forget what was barely known to begin with. Few may remember or maybe never knew what a force of nature Michael Ruppert was in the early days of our collective Peak Oil awareness. His “From the Wilderness” site was probably one of the most strident and prophetic resources out there. And I can attest that his voice helped shaped many of our current worldviews.

    When it became clear that he had obviously suffered from some kind of Nietzschean mental breakdown, I think that few were all that surprised. The veracity and passion he possessed for truth seeking was unrivaled and ultimately emotionally unsustainable. Like so many of us, it seems that throughout the last many years he struggled to find a balance with what he knew was coming and how to strike peace with it. In a somewhat diminished state, his pendulum seems to have swung wildly in seeking a new identity that was not so consumed with all the reasons for outrage. Who could blame him? And not unlike many of the social activist who have come before, his journey eventually turned inward.

    He was one of the first to blaze the trail ahead of us and where even his suicide……is sadly no less prophetic.

    Give my best to Abbie and Hunter, you were a champion of mine Mike, you will be missed.

  • Sorry, I’m not buying this story. He just moved back to CA… had a new relationship… advertising for a place to live on Craigslist… etc. etc.

  • @Liz
    You are not buying that he is dead or that he did it?

  • It was about six years ago, in 2008 that I came across Michael Ruppert and read his book “A Presidential Energy Policy”. The book was later re-titled “Confronting Collapse: The Crisis of Energy and Money in a Post Peak World” so it would synchronize with his movie.

    Michael opened up the big picture for me which, of course, is the interrelationship of industrial agriculture, cold storage/transportation, and peak energy.

    I have this vivid recollection of seeing something ordinary before reading his book, but horrifying afterwards. It was a groundskeeper driving a tractor pulling a two-ton water trailer watering flower beds in planters! I suppose much of human energy consumption could be considered equally frivolous, but that image gets me for some reason.

    Thanks Michael and thank you Guy for showing me just how close we are to an exponential explosion of change (and ignoring the fact that I appear to be the over-excitable village idiot).

    BTW, the forecast is for freezing temperatures in the deep south on April 16th while the longest day of the year is only two months away…

  • I was first acquainted with the idea that there might be large scale disruptions within a human lifetime with Jay Hanson’s dieoff com/org and Mike Ruppert’s From the Wilderness.

    Each of them had a plethora of links. Events of course continued to progress apace, by any human yardstick. Links led to others, and a The Energy Bulletin provided what was then referred to as the “magnum opus”: Dr. McPherson’s address to a graduating class of Public Health folks (sort of reminiscent of Admiral Hyman Rickover’s talk to a meeting of a state medical association). That was the introduction to Nature Bats Last. Or is it now Nature Bastes Last? Meanwhile The Energy Bulletin met its demise, its superb format being replaced by Resilience org.

    It was unfortunate for Mr. Ruppert that events transpired as they did. The search for Reality is almost impossibly difficult as long as one does not recognise that the Seeker is the Sought. The Parable of the Tenth Man

    One might say that the mantle of magnum opus has now passed to “Climate Change summary and Update”.

  • I was first acquainted with the idea that there might be large scale disruptions within a human lifetime with Jay Hanson’s dieoff com/org and Mike Ruppert’s From the Wilderness.

    Each of them had a plethora of links. Events of course continued to progress apace, by any human yardstick. Links led to others, and a The Energy Bulletin provided what was then referred to as the “magnum opus”: Dr. McPherson’s address to a graduating class of Public Health folks (sort of reminiscent of Admiral Hyman Rickover’s talk to a meeting of a state medical association). That was the introduction to Nature Bats Last. Or is it now Nature Bastes Last? Meanwhile The Energy Bulletin met its demise, its superb format being replaced by Resilience org.

    It was unfortunate for Mr. Ruppert that events transpired as they did. The search for Reality is almost impossibly difficult as long as one does not recognise that the Seeker is the Sought. The Parable of the Tenth Man

    One might say that the mantle of magnum opus has now passed to “Climate Change summary and Update”.

  • I think that at certain level of consciousness suicide is not committed driven by desperation or mental emotional dysfunction but by some sort of sudden realization or enlightenment, and happens not by contemplating or preparation but happens from one moment to the next without any obvious prelude that`s why it is not understood but feared and negatively judged by the regular level folks of consciousnesses. I can imagine that at this moment some sort of autoimpulse takes over and executes the act we call suicide. From the perspective of the soul or spirit it is just a convenient method to proceed . For the regular folks this is inconceivable and inconceivable . Why <? Life for the masses is about survival and it is the prime objective . Survival by any means . Eating procreating extending life by any means and method *survival of the fittest) this is also our downfall . We should have listened to the great mystics they have all been telling us ; "Life is not given for life`s sake life is given for beautifications sake . If life was given for life sake what can be taken away It can be annihilated and rendered useless and meaningless . Therefore life is just a secondary means to the higher purpose . I am sure Mike was pretty good on the real purpose of his …its all good !

  • R.I.P. Mike.

    A hero. A Prometheus.

    Guy and everyone else thanks for hanging in there and keeping the beach open. I feel that things are going to get really ugly now.

    Perhaps in his passing he has set an example that many of us would be emulating sooner or later.

  • I understand the act of suicide, but I am a little embarrassed to say that I am very curious to see exactly how events turn out, inevitable as they are.

  • I guess it’s too early to ask if his place is available.

    (kidding, Mike liked a joke)

    goodbye, Mike
    you taught me a lot

  • Retrospective of Michael’s perspective. One can see that Guy had a huge impact on Michael in Part 4.

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 1)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 2)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 3)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 4)
    Mentions Guy’s work and other examples of climate change

    One of the few to stand up and say that Fukushima Daiichi is not a Japanese problem but a humanity problem…
    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 5)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 6)

  • Retrospective of Michael’s perspective. One can see that Guy had a huge impact on Michael in Part 4.

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 1)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 2)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 3)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 4)
    Mentions Guy’s work and other examples of climate change

    One of the few to stand up and say that Fukushima Daiichi is not a Japanese problem but a humanity problem…
    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 5)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 6)

  • Retrospective of Michael’s perspective. One can see that Guy had a huge impact on Michael in Part 4.

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 1)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 2)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 3)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 4)
    Mentions Guy’s work and other examples of climate change

    One of the few to stand up and say that Fukushima Daiichi is not a Japanese problem but a humanity problem…
    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 5)

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End (Part 6)

  • TIP, Mile.

    I first came across him via reading High Times magazine around early 2001, he was an investigative journalist who had done excellent work exposing CIA involvement in, indeed supervision of, the Central America drug trade, was writing every week regarding the “war on drugs” and its use to justify military intervention overseas. When 9/11 came, he was one of the first to subject the official story to scrutiny and then the ridicule and exposes which it deserves, as well as to educate the public about global Peak Oil. I worked with a group of activists which was in close contact with him. I fell out of his favor when, contrary to his staunch opposition, i began raising the physical evidence, and was accused of breaking “group discipline,” i.e. his unquestioned leadership. Indeed i got more and more disgusted by the utterly irrational attacks he made upon physical evidence. But in terms of shedding light on our gathering resources/ecological crisis, he was stellar, to the end.

    He was friends with some friends of mine, remained so to the end. I can understand his total despair. The followings not meant as a judgement of what he has done. But i want you all to know: If you ever hear that i committed suicide out of despair, DO NOT BELIEVE IT, IT WOULD BE A LIE!! Tif they wanna get rid of me, they’;; have to come get me.

  • I join everyone here in expressing deep sadness at the end of the life of Michael C. Ruppert. He was an important landmark for me in the unfamiliar landscape of our decline. Another piece gone missing. More grief on the stack. In the great blizzard of pain, occasionally a quiet moment of crystalline stillness arrives. That’s all we get, then it’s gone.

    Normally there’d be some consolation from thoughts of fresh life… but now beginnings are incarcerations to ferocious endings.

    Peanuts

    To all in the family here: May each find just cause to desire every remaining breath of the miracle. Otherwise, hear the howl and radiate compassion – for yourself or others, as need arises. Everything passes quickly, grab some joy out of the blur.

  • WOW!
    Abby Martin’s Personal Tribute to Investigative Journalist Michael C. Ruppert

  • For Mike —

    “In spite of my rage

    I am still just a rat in a cage.” — Smashing Pumpkins

    I see more and more how Guy’s concept of “we are all born into captivity” is relevant to the rage and frustration felt in so many ways. Our fundamental nature has been undermined by “this set of living arrangements.”

    Some revolt in ways that rebound back on themselves, but what’s their alternative? Just think about when generations exist in captivity. The film “12 Years a Slave” strikes us because we know that he was born free. We can feel his outrage. But what about all the others?

  • It feels really shitty when the ones that helped wake us up and build our own lifeboats climb out of theirs for the peace of disconsciousness. I hope no one else ever experiences that level of despair. Hell, I want to stick around just to see how the movie ends. Thanks for being a great teacher, Mike. You made a difference.

  • The misidentification is with what is born & dies, through a mental construct called the “I”. This carries with it the additional baggage of being the “doer” and the “enjoyer/sufferer”.

    One of the characteristics of the Realised

  • I have no words except i’ll miss his perspective and inspirational words. Sorry for our loss, i’m drifting in the fog.

    Some music for pondering:

    http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=AtTHM0beiokArmyesFjmC5qbvZx4?fr=yfp-t-901-1-s&toggle=1&cop=mss&ei=UTF-8&p=harold%20budd%20the%20pearl

  • Exploding cities

    (Chitown is limited in one direction by Lake Michigan).

  • I too will miss Mike and the contribution he made to me and all of us who would listen. The circumstances of his death leave me questioning. As others have shared it doesn’t all add up. Why now? Perhaps we will come to know more, maybe not. But clearly we have lost a great man who consistently strived to bring the truth to light. May we all carry Mike’s spirit and determination forward for however long we have to do so. It’s a very sad day indeed.

  • “There’s a dirt floor underneath here,
    To receive us when changes fail”

    Peace to Michael…and to Chris

  • I didn’t know Mike Ruppert and only knew of him from this site.

    I do know about suicide. My mother made at least two attempts, and my sister made many before she was “successful.”

    She was three months into a marriage to a guy out of her usual mode, and we were all hopeful she had turned a corner. One night, when her new husband was gone, she went into the garage with a bottle of wine, her phone, and every medication she was taking for depression, turned on the car, went to sleep and died. She was 42. She left a husband and a son.

    She’ll never know her grandchild or her daughter in law.

    Her pain was too great.

    Everything that everyone is feeling about Mike…..I feel you, so much. You probably won’t ever get over it, but the pain will lessen with time. Sounds like a platitude, but sometimes they are true.

    Mr. Ruppert, as a former police, went out the way many police do…they call it “eating the gun.” He did not want to miss, is my guess. He was serious, he meant it, and we should take that in.

    Here is the fact that we all turn away from: Sometimes the pain is so great that only death will stop it.

    My sincere condolences to everyone mourning Mike.

  • Guy and Co.,

    My Dad was one of the gentlest human beings I have ever known. A middle school science and math teacher, he impacted the lives and hundreds, if not thousands of children and of course, me. I can remember him saying “Population, population, population. Son, population drives everything else.” Not a popular message in the booming eighties. Even years after his death, Mom still gets the occasional phone call or letter from a former student. Dad was a diabetic, and the kidneys finally went to shit. They would do dialysis. He would be wiped out physically for a whole day afterwards, and then they would have to do it again. so he said, “to hell with it, this is no way to live” and refused the treatment. He died shortly thereafter.

    Michael C. Ruppert was one of the seminal figures who opened my eyes to the monstrosity of Empire, hidden beneath the sanctity of the Capitol Dome and the shiny veneer of suburbia. His voice will be greatly missed. I suspect that the dialysis of trying to spread knowledge to a deaf public, wiped him out more and more each time, till said “to hell with it.”

    In the fullness of time, we are all headed there one way or the other. George R.R. Martin phrases this as Valar Morghulis (all men must die). Equally elegant is the ritual response, Valar Dohaeris (all men must serve). Dad served, as did Miachael, as do you, Guy. And so should we all. Please accept my deepest sympathies.

    “And they were offended in him. But Jesus said unto them, A prophet is not without honour, save in his own country, and in his own house.” -Matt. 13:57

    Regards,

    dweebus

  • Michael,

    You were a truly great man and offered so much of yourself selflessly to empower and inspire our community. We keep up the fight in your honour and will miss you dearly.

    Rest in peace.

  • I met Mike in Sebastopol about 3 years ago at a presentation by our mutual friend Nichole Foss. At that time I would not have thought him a candidate for suicide. But, I now understand that there can be a risk to committing oneself to saving humankind. Such people have been dying prematurely for at least two millenia. May I suggest to Guy that he try to regulate his commitment. Don’t stop though, I appreciate being informed.

    I would like to add that Abby Martin is a class act working for a classy network. The world would be a little better with a few more of both.

    We are the human animal. Product of an ultimately lethal mutation. We were always going to get to where we are and I see nothing that will keep us from going where we’re going. Yes, we are boned.

  • Like many who come here, I am filled with such sadness at Mike’s passing. At the same time, I cannot even begin to imagine the burdens and sorrows he has been carrying for such a long time. He truly has been a voice From The Wilderness, truly was a warrior, an honorable man, who through circumstances and nature was unable to continue on into the future that is closing in on us all.

    He’s done way more than enough, and deserves to be released from his fight. Go in peace, Mike, you made a difference and you are loved.

  • Too many embeds screws up the display, particularly on mobile devices. Wherever possible, a playlist is much to be preferred:

    Apocalypse, Man: Michael C. Ruppert on World’s End YouTube Playlist

  • Out house-sitting in the country on vacation and just heard the news this afternoon. Dear Mike, spent the last 4 hours with my wife honoring your passing by playing and singing a variety of tunes starting with One Tin Soldier while putting back two bottles of red. Going to close now with Calling All Angels. Tears shed, smiles shown forth and all emotions in between.

    You are a warrior, we honor your passing, and know you are being embraced in love and honor on the other side. See you there.

    Will miss you brother,

    Jed (& Patty)

  • Farewell Michael of the wilderness.
    We were sitting in the dark here, listening… thank you for all you gave.
    Break on through to the other side brother, we’ll cover this end.

  • @PMB (previous thread)

    As I recall, I found Jensen & DGR by accident and then found NBL via a ‘recommended video’ suggestion on the right side of the YT page where I watched “Endgame”. Rupert I found via NBL comments pages.

    Like wildwoman, I suspect that Jensen has a very good idea of what would ensue from the death of 6.1 billion (to use Mike Ruppert’s figure) humans, most of whom, were it not for oil & gas, most likely would not be here now. Lifeboat Algebra can be a tough subject for anyone. It’s probably worse in direct proportion to your level of general empathy toward living beings. And it’ll probably get worse pretty soon.

    But this is the lifeboat we built.

    Look on the bright side though…unless there’s some transhumanist technology available to save those 6.1 billion onto digital media, then we’re talking about the timetable for their inevitable demise…we don’t have an opt-out process yet for death.

    RIP Mike Ruppert

    Nothin’s gonna bring him back…keep him in your heart as long as you can.

    After seeing the Colorado area in “Apocalypse, Man”, I considered “He’s Gone” as a goodbye tune. There’s mountains in the lyrics…

    Going where the wind don’t blow so strange
    Maybe on some high cold mountain range
    Lost one round but the price wasn’t anything
    Knife in a back and more of the same

    Moved on to “Jack Straw” by the same group…serious lyrics for a serious man…

    We used to play for silver
    Now we play for life
    One’s for sport and one’s for blood
    At the point of a knife

    But he’s gone and don’t need a song…anyone who knew him does, though.

    For Jessie Mae (sp?) and anyone who was remotely close to him…

  • “April is the cruelest month, breeding
    lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
    memory and desire, stirring
    dull roots with spring rain.”

    ― T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land

    Spring/Summer is known as suicide-season because of a strange effect of sunshine on our hormones.

    Mike was one of my heroes and my heart is shattered. Hugs to you all.

  • from my research of the effect of sunlight on the suicidal– a seasonal correlation is consistent across nations and in each hemisphere. in this sense, it was the gentle winter light that may have kept him with us a little longer.

    he said he meant to die in colorado, so many felt that california meant he had survived the impulse in colorado.

    our days with Michael were dwindling all winter, we only had until the sun came back, and thawed-out his tender heart.

    i pass these hours surrounded on my bedroom floor with egg cartons harboring seedlings and watching in silence, my baby chicks play. it helps to nurture anything, to be able to bear the horrific pictures this tragedy ushered into one’s mind.

  • @Mike Ruppert

    You knew too many things you could never un-know. You saw too many things you could never un-see. You carried the burden as much as anyone. Rest now Mike.

  • @ Infanttyrone

    Please email me: shepherd2121 at teleclipse dot net.

    Tks.

  • Carolyn Baker’s latest contribution is included in the latest post, along with video from last night’s presentation. Catch it all here.