Edge of Extinction Playlist

Several video clips are included within the “Edge of Extinction” series. Some have not been posted in this space. Catch the full playlist here.

    

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I’m traveling, and will be less available than usual. Please display patience when waiting for comments to be posted.
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Please visit the DONATIONS tab. I’m open to non-monetary donations, subject only to your creativity. For example, I would appreciate your generosity with respect to frequent-flyer miles.
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Catch Nature Bats Last on the radio with Mike Sliwa and Guy McPherson. Tune in every Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, or catch up in the archives here. If you prefer the iTunes version, including the option to subscribe, you can click here.

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Abrupt Climate Change: How Will You Show Up During Humanity’s Final Chapter?

4-16 March, Northern California Tour organized by Peter Melton: 530-680-5550,
Peter.Melton3@gmail.com. Additional venues may be added.

11-12 March 2015, Veterans Hall, 415 North Pine Street, Nevada City, California, presentation and workshop titled, “Abrupt Climate Change: How Will You Show Up During Humanity’s Final Chapter?” Follow on Facebook here.

11 March: 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. presentation and public discussion
11 March: 8:30 – 10:00 p.m. workshop part I
12 March: 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. workshop part II

13-14 March 2015, Chico Peace and Justice Center, 526 Broadway, Chico, California, presentation and workshop titled, “Abrupt Climate Change: How Will You Show Up During Humanity’s Final Chapter?” Follow on Facebook here.

13 March 13: 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. presentation and public discussion
13 March: 8:30 – 10:00 p.m. workshop part I
14 March: 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. workshop part II

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22 March – 3 April Boston, Massachusetts. Details to follow.

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6-30 April 2015, western Europe (additional details forthcoming, and follow the tour at guymcpherson.net and also on Facebook)

25 April 2015, 6:00 p.m., Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London, “Climate Awareness Seminar”

European tour spring 2015

McPherson’s latest book is co-authored by Carolyn Baker. Extinction Dialogs: How to Live with Death in Mind is available. Electronic copy is available here from Amazon.

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Tech note, courtesy of mo flow: Random issues have been appearing with posting comments. Sometimes a “Submit Comment” click will return a 404 Page Not Found, or another error, for no apparent reason. To ensure you don’t lose a longer comment, you can right-click select all, and right-click copy, in the comment box before clicking “Submit.” If that hasn’t been done, the comment text will likely still be in the comment box when clicking the back button, or the forward button — depending on the error — on your browser.

Comments 59

  • I used one of the videos in the play list (But, I Read It In Escapism Megazine).

    Did anyone see the paper that implicates global warming induced climate change in the Syrian War?

    This is the link to it (Climate change in the Fertile Crescent and implications of the recent Syrian drought).

    This could mean that one of the tipping points or unintended consequences of climate change (including sea level rise) could be nuclear war.

  • I wonder how many individuals are working on the capturing of methane as the next great energy source. HA!

  • @ Dredd Says:
    March 3rd, 2015 at 7:43 am

    This could mean that one of the tipping points or unintended consequences of climate change (including sea level rise) could be nuclear war.

    I concur. As resource (food, water, energy, etc.) availability becomes restricted and export of those products drop to zero “cooperation” will be the LAST thing on any nation’s agenda. Moreover, there seems to be no lack of politicians and militarists, the world over, who appear dead-set on escalating tensions and conflict. Perhaps that, too, is an unintended consequence of our poisoning of the biosphere. I fully expect to see the growth of global “mega-mushrooms” and said as much more than 5 years ago on this site. When it will occur is, of course, near impossible to predict but I’m certain it will be much sooner than reasonable entities would like.

  • We have to produce more food in the next 50 years than we did in the last 500.
    http://www.csiro.au/Portals/Multimedia/On-the-record/Sustainable-Agriculture-Feeding-the-World.aspx

    By 2025, two-thirds of the people on earth will be short of water.
    http://www.worldwildlife.org/threats/water-scarcity

    We are running out of easy access to potassium, phosphates and soil.
    http://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2013/04/01/phosphorus-essential-to-life-are-we-running-out/

    We are at peak wheat, maize, soy and rice.
    http://energyskeptic.com/2015/20-peak-resources-limits-to-growth/

    The President of the World Bank, Jim Yong Kim, says we will be fighting for food and water within 10 years.
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/apr/03/climate-change-battle-food-head-world-bank

  • mo flow,

    Thanks for your wonderful, thought provoking, deepening questions March 2nd, 2015 at 7:41 pm!

    Regarding my statement that “Attachment occurs as an innate and primary motivating force with all healthy humans” this view, based on natural science, unfortunately clashes with Robin Datta’s and some other’s religious/philosophical views regarding an alleged undesirability of attachment. Indeed, it directly contradicts some of those fundamental beliefs. My emotions tend strongly to drive me to place my faith for gaining the most reliable knowledge about how the universe most likely works in the open processes of natural science, not in the self-contained, closed, cognitive processes of philosophy and/or religion. These, for the most part in my opinion, amount to an infinite regress of words, about words, about words with little or no reliable comparisons with supporting or non-supporting evidence from the world outside of our heads. I do not think in either all-or-none terms, nor in terms of certainties, regarding these things, but instead in terms of continua and probabilities. With this infinite-scale and probabilistic thinking, it seems far, far more likely than not to me that (1) we humans will find ourselves either extinct, or very near extinction, well before 2050, and (2) that the processes of natural science produce much more reliable knowledge about how humans in particular, and the universe in general, work than philosophy and religion do. These just remain my highly fallible, emotionally driven, ultimately faith-based opinions. I remain massively ignorant and surely have many things not just wrong, but dramatically wrong.

    Regarding your point that “if this is all the case, it seems like the ‘music’ of our ongoing attachment dance with a healthy biosphere would have been critically important, all along, for humans”, my response comes directly from much anthropological and biological science. Yes, for sure, much like obeying the laws of physics these principles have proven critically important for humans. In times and places when and where human individuals and groups did not “obey” these fundamental biological, psychological attachment principles, people, including untold numbers of individuals and groups of different sizes, including many entire earlier collapsed civilizations, have suffered greatly.

    But perhaps with your statement that “if this is all the case, it seems like the ‘music’ of our ongoing attachment dance with a healthy biosphere would have been critically important, all along, for humans” you mean to suggest that evolution “should” have made us behave in ways such that over time we would not have “broken the rules”. If so, this assumption grows out of a false premise that evolution presumably works in a teleological way to produce “good”, “healthy” outcomes over the long term. But evolution does NOT work in that way. No law of the universe states that evolution “must” or “should” produce “successful” or “healthy” outcomes according to our merely human standards! Indeed, the vast majority of evolution’s “experiments” have resulted in dramatic “failures”, as we would probably assess them from our massively ignorant, narrow, self-centered, human perspective and values regarding life and death.

    You asked “so where and how did this music get silenced enough to be overridden, in relationship to a healthy biosphere? Or ‘including Earth’s biosphere and other species’ as you mention?” In my opinion, the “silencing” occurred through the availability of additional energy beginning with agriculture, but especially with fossil fuels for our creative, language-facilitated, highly intelligent brains, our dexterous hands, and our other capabilities to work with in powerful ways expressing Howard Odum’s Maximum Power Principle: we make maximum use of the energy available. Earth’s biosphere, and the larger thermodynamic principles of the universe on which Earth functions, “built all of this into the cake” from the start.

    You wrote “clearly it would be evident to humans, at any point, if they were doing great or lasting harm to the biosphere. if this harm provoked a negative emotional response, it seems humans would have *felt* that, and changed their behavior accordingly.” Do you see humans even today with our incredible technology and now massive evidence of the damage we have done, and continue to do to the biosphere, “changing their behavior accordingly”? I certainly don’t. If we don’t with all of our scientific knowledge, understanding, and instant, world-wide communication, truly astounding and miraculous in comparison with that of earlier humans, why would you assume that earlier humans in their great ignorance and lack of communication, by comparison, would change their behavior accordingly? I think that you make this statement based on the false premise that they supposedly had great knowledge of biological and ecological principles that we have only recently constructed (and that people presumably change their behaviors based on a rational appraisal of such knowledge). How could they possibly have known about the devastating changes they made in their environments when many of these changes occur very slowly over hundreds of years? Remember: these people for the most part did not even have writing, much less any scientific understanding of evolution, geology, biology, mathematics, and so on. They had no understanding of what causes rain or lightening, much less knowledge of soil science, species, or species extinction. Yes, as Jared Diamond writes in The Rise and Fall of the Third Chimpanzee, “It is still true that small, long-established, egalitarian societies tend to evolve conservationist practices, because they have had plenty of time to get to know their local environment and to perceive their own self-interest.” Even so “We cling to belief in a Rousseau-esque fantasy that the past was a Golden Age of environmentalism, when people lived in harmony with Nature. In reality, human societies, including those of stone-age farmers and possibly of hunter-gatherers as well, have been undermining their own subsistence by exterminating species and damaging environments for thousands of years. We differ from our supposedly conservationist forebears only in our greater numbers, more potent technology for inflicting damage, and access to written histories from which we refuse to learn.”

    You wrote “so either:

    – humans did *not* actually feel an emotional attachment to a healthy biosphere.” I would say not at all necessarily true. I think that many humans DID historically, and DO today, feel strongly emotionally attached to our biosphere, probably often worshiping it. But ignorance regarding the fundamental processes has for most of human history reigned. People can love the biosphere AND at the same time damage it out of ignorance and/or short-term, emotional, immediate gratification priorities, just as people can love their children and yet also do incredibly hurtful things to them. Indeed, people often hurt others in the name of love. I think that this favorite quote of mine by Jared Diamond in his book The Third Chimpanzee states a deep and important truth: “The past was a Golden Age, of ignorance, while the present is an Iron Age of willful blindness.”

    You wrote:

    “– humans felt this attachment, and felt the emotional pain of destructive behavior being wrought on the biosphere, and they couldn’t find a way to ‘re-attach’ (if that is the right idea) with healthy behavior again.

    – or some key piece of the puzzle is missing in this, with the idea of how attachment theory relates to humans and the biosphere.

    so, if attachment is ‘innate and primary’ as you say, where or how did human attachment to a healthy biosphere go ‘off the rails’ here? what do you think?”

    First, please remember that in my recent writing I have taken the liberty of extending attachment theory beyond its firm research foundation based on Bowlby’s childhood development work and Gottman and Johnson’s work with adult couples and families. I have ASSUMED, possibly wrongly, that the principles they have constructed probably extend to most if not all of our relationships with other humans. Then, based mainly on my deep sense of attachment to other species, Earth, and the universe more generally, which feelings of attachment I think helps me greatly to manage my anxiety and fear related to the high probability of NTHE in healthy ways (just as suggested by attachment theory!), I have further assumed that attachment theory probably also extends to our relationships with other species and Earth. Again, I might well have any or all of this wrong. With this in mind, I will respond to your last question based on the idea that I may have these extensions more right than wrong:

    I think that human attachment to a healthy biosphere for the most part went “off the rails” gradually over a long period, in in a geographically diffused way, largely beginning about 10,000 years ago with the access to energy that became available to us due to the development of agriculture in various places around the planet. That additional energy allowed technologies to develop, populations to grow, and the development of cities, culminating most recently in our fatal use of fossil fuels, which turbocharged the preexisting energy concentration and use processes that have developed gradually throughout our entire history as a species. I think that in that long-term process, in general (with some local exceptions, of course, but short-term on the evolutionary time scale) we have become ever more disconnected and alienated from, ever more unattached to, the biosphere that produced and supports us.

  • http://arctic-news.blogspot.ca/2012/10/saving-the-arctic-ice-2.html

    This quote from this 2012 article by Nathan Currier might help some of the commenters remind themselves where things are apparently at right now on all of this. The person referred to is James Hansen.

    “He didn’t say that non-CO2 reductions wouldn’t still be helpful (they are 100 percent necessary right away, just as massive CO2 reductions to near-zero by mid-century are necessary), but he certainly didn’t say that they could halt the loss of the sea ice now alone, either — indeed, I believe that the numbers show that they can’t. It has now become clear that emissions reductions alone can no longer save the arctic ice. This is a big deal, and it needs to sink in.”

  • We’re well on the way to extinction: your 2 minutes of news

    and let’s hear it for humanity, because we’re so special – and the more authority you have, the more you can abuse it!

    Child Protective Services Kids Found in Human Trafficking

  • Great job, Guy!

    A cool take on non-violent direct action:
    http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/wise-disruption-buddhism-and-direct-action

    Shep says, “I wonder how many individuals are working on the capturing of methane as the next great energy source. HA!”

    Not me pal, sorry to say. I can’t even capture the methane being produced by the two bowls of chili I ate last night.

    2 bowls full = 1 bowels full. I don’t get it!

    If all the large intestines on the planet were linked together, end to end. How far would they stretch if you stretched them?

    If you haven’t seen the movie, Human Centipede, stay that way!

  • Bud –

    thanks a bunch for your well-considered and thoughtful response. more very good stuff!

    for the whole “what value philosophy?” question – to each his/her own! your “infinite regress” can be another’s “infinite playground” – whether of words and ideas, or experience and relationship. when one has the time and opportunity to dwell on these things, it is a matter of personal preference where one goes with it (as opposed to commonly agreed facts about the Universe, or testable hypotheses). but you get to that reality when you are talking about it being, for you, a matter of faith-based opinion in some sense.

    “you mean to suggest that evolution “should” have made us behave in ways such that over time we would not have “broken the rules”. If so, this assumption grows out of a false premise that evolution presumably works in a teleological way to produce “good”, “healthy” outcomes over the long term.”

    actually, I was thinking along your first paragraph about these principles. it is like a law, similar to physical law. you go again certain laws, you suffer.

    and no, I don’t see evolution as working in a teleological way. I do see other forces at work, than what we have with basic evolution as we understand it now. for the human ego, as it now operates “in the large,” these other forces may not seem terribly healthy or good at all. in fact, they could likely feel extremely threatening.

    “we make maximum use of the energy available.”

    indeed. again, in this sense, “we” are the human ego, operating on the large scale.

    just as a thought experiment: if you were part of an ultra-advanced race, and your race knew there were vastly greater “energies” out there that could be made available, would you turn over the keys to this kingdom to a bunch of high-strung, addictively wired monkeys?

    no, you would not. you would either go out of your way to keep them from accessing this advanced power; you would destroy them if necessary to prevent them from unleashing their particular madness on the rest of the Universe; or you would find some clever ways of changing them without destroying them, so they became something else. however, given the deeply ingrained nature of their “wiring” they might intuitively sense that this change was the same as death to what they understood now as “normal,” “healthy” or “good.”

    “as we would probably assess them from our massively ignorant, narrow, self-centered, human perspective and values regarding life and death.”

    exactly!

    “Do you see humans even today with our incredible technology and now massive evidence of the damage we have done, and continue to do to the biosphere, “changing their behavior accordingly”? I certainly don’t.”

    uh, no. I don’t see it, either! totally agreed. what exactly the future holds is another question.

    “I think that you make this statement based on the false premise that they supposedly had great knowledge of biological and ecological principles that we have only recently constructed”

    no, actually, I was approaching it more from the emotional/feeling side of attachment theory. we feel the pain when our families and relationships are unhealthy. we would (possibly) feel similar pain with our relationship to the biosphere. if we *don’t* feel that pain, and act on it to heal, then attachment theory wouldn’t apply here, it seems. or, if our addictive natures override that pain, and we persist in unhealthy behavior, then something else is amiss.

    “In reality, human societies, including those of stone-age farmers and possibly of hunter-gatherers as well, have been undermining their own subsistence by exterminating species and damaging environments for thousands of years. We differ from our supposedly conservationist forebears only in our greater numbers, more potent technology for inflicting damage, and access to written histories from which we refuse to learn.”

    this statement from Diamond is somewhat misleading, I think. look at his use of the words “in reality” and then later “and possibly” in that paragraph.

    certain practices, such as agriculture, gave us the potential to overpopulate. we didn’t have to take up the offer! where was the line crossed that practices like irrigation became more desirable, more “naturally human” than practices of hunting and gathering? small groups of humans got access to large surplus. they *liked* having a large surplus, more than they liked chasing down a large mammal and impaling it. in some way, *maybe* they actually saw themselves as leading less bloody, less dangerous, and more peaceful, natural lifestyles this way.

    it could very easily just have “been missed” that small-scale agriculture was *possibly* more damaging, long-term, than what felt like riskier and bloodier struggles for regular meat and reliable forage. humans wandered into the progress trap, without realizing it. but that does *not* mean that earlier hunter-gatherers were not leading long-term sustainable lifestyles – “Naturally in balance” could have been just that! – for these groups of HGs.

    I think Diamond knows he is on thin ice here, and that is why he *very* deliberately includes the word “possibly” when he says “possibly of hunter-gatherers as well” – he knows that particular part is not supported by current evidence, in any serious way.

    (also, some recent research points to massively large scale “agricultural engineering” of the amazon by some prehistoric cultures. this has only just turned up in the evidence, and I don’t have a reference offhand, but it involved changing large parts of the forest so much that some archaeologists and biologists are now wondering just how “natural” the amazon really is! apparently this was long-term, sustainable, practice that radically changed much of the forest for farming purposes. a great deal of the “hard evidence” was lost to decay, and has only turned up with recent high-tech, sensitive detection methods).

    once humans wandered into the first, tiniest, part of the progress trap, it certainly appears that other forces became active, and things accelerated, with certain groups, from there.

    “But ignorance regarding the fundamental processes has for most of human history reigned.”

    this is a bit of a tricky one, for me. I don’t accept the fundamental premise that human ego is the only force at play. whenever “ignorance” is used like this, I think “whose ignorance?”

    “we” – the ever debated personal pronoun. some say “we” are *only* our mortal human egos, our collective stories we tell each other and ourselves, and our limited familiar perceptions based on our everyday waking consciousness.

    others, myself included, define what “we” are very differently, with essentially no connection at all to the first idea. my idea is that I am an undefined, moving point of Being, and the only thing I know is that I freely exist – with no reliance on any “stuff of the world” for my existence. that stuff is only one small table at a very (infinitely) large party.

    my “we” is that I know I exist like this, but most of my fellow partiers are so engrossed in the shindig they have forgotten all about the bigger picture. they just want to know the punch bowl isn’t going dry, or they want someone to reassure them it will be refilled in the future, in some undetermined way they can “have faith” in.

    my “we” thinks: no big deal for them in their current inebriated state. the party will go on in the big picture, despite the temporary fears and addictions at this particular table.

    one thing that is fairly obvious: if one wants to control and dominate other humans, the first idea of “we” is the absolute best! it allows for so many delicious possibilities when it comes to wielding fear as an instrument of “power-over” and control.

    “Jared Diamond in his book The Third Chimpanzee states a deep and important truth: “The past was a Golden Age, of ignorance, while the present is an Iron Age of willful blindness.””

    and again, with this, the question is: whose ignorance? Jared is assuming the collective “we” of our ancestors was as ignorant in the “ways of the Universe” (of the Big Party) as so many seem today. I’m not so certain about that.

    I see *exactly* where you are coming from, Bud, in your last two paragraphs above. I think this is a brilliant way of looking at it, really.

    the disconnect from the biosphere has fallen into the most radical place possible now – and it certainly shows no signs of stopping. on its own.

    as with families that have fallen into radical, destructive dysfunction, the “larger society” may be forced to intervene, or intervention may already be underway. I wonder what that might be like? I’m pretty sure there are *many* possibilities here, and nothing is written in stone.

  • Fire on the mountain! Run boys run!
    That’s what Charlie Daniels sung.
    But it turns out that it
    Was a big pile of shit!
    From all of our devilish fun!

    http://gawker.com/climbers-leaving-everest-shit-covered-biohazard-sherpa-1689317081

  • @Bud: First, please remember that in my recent writing I have taken the liberty of extending attachment theory beyond its firm research foundation based on Bowlby’s childhood development work and Gottman and Johnson’s work with adult couples and families. I have ASSUMED, possibly wrongly, that the principles they have constructed probably extend to most if not all of our relationships with other humans.

    Then, based mainly on my deep sense of attachment to other species, Earth, and the universe more generally, which feelings of attachment I think helps me greatly to manage my anxiety and fear related to the high probability of NTHE in healthy ways (just as suggested by attachment theory!), I have further assumed that attachment theory probably also extends to our relationships with other species and Earth. Again, I might well have any or all of this wrong. With this in mind, I will respond to your last question based on the idea that I may have these extensions more right than wrong…

    >>>

    Bud, I totally get that this is your particular coping mechanism in the face of the NTHE/NTE memes, and the anxiety and fear they are producing in your own mind.

    This phenomenon arises for the first time in human development at about 6 months of age, when the infant’s conscious first recognizes that it is somehow separate from everything else (and most typically its primary caretaker). The experiment is a classic: When the caretaker hides herself from the child, it experiences fear and anxiety of felt separation.

    The phenomenon bifurcates in the developing consciousness, and has another spurt during the so-called “terrible twos”, when the child begins to say NO to everything, just to feel its own developing autonomy.

    Of course, further bifurcation and development continues to unfold through intellectual adulthood, when the now functioning Piagetian adult (at about age 13) has the full capacity for abstract thought and expression. It not only FEELS alone and lonely, but can write poems and essays about its existential predicament.

    And at that point, most people choose a palliative strategy that – to borrow from Robert Callahan’s pithy phrase, involve “worshipping beaver”…whatever “beaver” might mean to you.

    Don’t you need somebody to love?
    Don’t you want some body to love?
    Wouldn’t you love somebody to love?
    You better find somebody to love!!!

    Voila…attachment theory! Where’s my tit (or whatever) to suck on?

    And hey, whatever gets you through the night…it’s alright…it’s already.

    Only don’t go making pronouncements about it as if you know what your talking about, when there is a Mt Everest sized pile of empirical evidence that this is only the view from the back of Plato’s Cave (and how’s that for mixing metaphors?).

    The thesis of the mystics (for lack of a better word) is that the attachment you covet and seek (or the beaver you worship) is actually the mother of sorrows. Why? Because when that to which you are deeply attached is ripped out of your life, you are going to suffer like HELL.

    Fear.
    Anxiety.
    Rage.
    Sorrow.
    Suicidal ideation…

    The three poisons – or 5 or 10 – are just going to make you miserable, just like they made that 6 month old suffering separation anxiety miserable. Only he couldn’t understand or articulate his misery – and you can. And he would forget his as soon as Mom re-appeared. You can only forget yours when you sleep (maybe).

    So what folks like Robin, or Mo, or me are saying (for those who care to hear) is that there is a better way to both understand attachment AND to deal with its downside repercussions then just by seeking yet another fix.

    And that is NOT to say that you can’t enjoy and be blessed by all those things you are attached to. Puppies, the glory of nature, the grandchildren, your own life, good lovin’…whatever – it’s all good – but good as DESSERT, not as the main course.

    For the main course, if you REALLY want to mitigate suffering, you’ll go not for ATTACHMENT, but rather CREATIVE DETACHMENT.

    I use the word CREATIVE as a modifier to stress that this is not some schizoid or autistic state of psychic disrepair. Those kinds of detachment would be destructive, rather than creative.

    Now, all this is just Buddhism 101 (which apparently you don’t know much about). It’s a restatement of the Buddha’s basic idea that is summed up in THE FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS. I encourage you to spend some time googling that phrase, and thinking about what those truths are – and imply for your own life, and all our lives.

    Those of us who have accepted the NTE/NTHE meme are grappling with the fact that everything is going to be taken away, not just from us as individuals – but from us corporately. That’s why Guy and Carolyn like to call this little cyber-corner a “hospice” even though it more often resembles a lunatic asylum – certain a preview of things to come.

    And the whole point of hospice (as I am sure you know) is to help people with the difficult yet essential work of simply letting go of it all – so they can move on in peace to whatever comes next…whether that is nothing or something.

    When people do that, they’ve finally found the medicine that works against the three poisons which are provoked, engendered and yes, INFLAMED by our endless attachments to this, that and the other.

    Letting go of it all becomes the sacred work.

    Letting go of it all becomes the doorway out of Plato’s Cave.

    Letting go of it all becomes the bridge to an awakening that eluded us all those years when we worshipped the Beavers of our own lives.

    But waking up is hard to do…

    >>>

    Did you ever read Hesse’s Siddhartha, Bud? If not, I highly recommend it. It says all these things, but in an artful and easily digested way.

  • “But waking up is hard to do…”

    But you are already awake. You are as awake now as you have ever been. You have never been asleep

    “Did you ever read Hesse’s Siddhartha, Bud? If not, I highly recommend it. It says all these things, but in an artful and easily digested way”

    And doesn’t help in the slightest 🙂

  • “Did you ever read Hesse’s Siddhartha, Bud? If not, I highly recommend it. It says all these things, but in an artful and easily digested way”

    And doesn’t help in the slightest 🙂

    >>>

    And didn’t help in the slightest 🙂

    >>>

    There, I fixed it for you.

    No need to thank me, DG. I’m here to help.

  • Nice video… compact and to-the-point. This is perhaps how the rest of humanity becomes conscious of what’s going on… short videos like this one.

    In related news, Alarm Bells Toll For Human Civilization As World’s 12th Largest Mega-City To Run Out Of Water In Just 60 Days

    Finally, a comment on the previous thread… the thing with Buddhism is it originated and spread long after humans established hierarchies and control structures and long after propaganda techniques became sophisticated enough to keep relatively large populations in check. At this point, the ruling elites and their advisers had become politically experienced enough to distinguish between those philosophies that posed a threat to their power structures and those that enabled and fostered them. Those that enabled them were given impetus and carried all over the land and spread beyond to other kingdoms. Organized religion has long been the handmaiden to power and control. Who knows what the Buddha himself actually said. The powers that be were listening to him much more closely than the powers that weren’t. There’s no such thing as a meritocracy.

    I spent 10 days last year at a silent meditation retreat which was well-attended (over a hundred humans who left their jobs, daily routines, cell phones, etc. to learn/practice meditation for health, well-being, salvation and what have you). The retreat is set in a somewhat isolated location a midst beautiful rolling hills with fantastic views of the valleys and mountains beyond.

    I noticed something rather interesting and ironic. The woodpecker! Here we were sitting on our meditation cushions inside a large darkened building on a bright sunny morning, having been told by the teacher that humans are the only species capable of attaining salvation, a gift not within the reach of any other life form. A hundred humans sat in dead silence, trying to focus their attention on their breath. And the woodpecker starts knocking away on the wooden roof! Knock knock knock knock… it was loud enough to make the admin guy get up and go out and shoo it away. The woodpecker was there disturbing the peace on most days as if to warn us humans that they can’t get away with it, that they can’t set themselves apart from the outside world going inward and seeking salvation selfishly, sitting indoors in darkened halls. “This is my land. I live here. You come to my land, chop down my trees, build these ugly structures, sit inside them and think you are saving yourself… knock it off… knock knock knock knock…” And we humans don’t listen these days, of course. “Oh shush, go away and let me attain moksha”!

    Buddhism strikes me as rather anthropocentric, placing humanity above all other species, above the natural world. It makes sense considering it originated relatively recently in terms of the time scale of human civilization. And while Western Civilization definitely preached individualism for hundreds of years, Buddhism seems to have had a pretty good grip on it for thousands of years prior. “YOU and ONLY YOU can save yourself… no one can find you your salvation, you must do it yourself”. I know there are sects of Buddhism that say there’s no salvation for one unless there is salvation for everyone. That’s a bit closer to my perception of how things work. But time and again, I have heard many teachers emphasize the individualistic nature of attaining salvation, as if we are separate from others around us, and from other species and Mother Earth.

    I’m certain meditation helps us see this interconnection. All is one and one is all. But long before Buddhism came, our tribal ancestors saw this interconnectedness easily with little effort because they lived it daily. They didn’t need to be taught this by a teacher seated on a pedestal. They knew at a deep level that they are no different from other species that lived on their land, that the land birthed them and that the land took them back. They were not individuals but were members of the tribe, really an extended family. They were integral to the tribe like the limbs are integral to the body. They didn’t argue with each other over whether the heart was more important than the brain and knew implicitly that they all played a role, that all expressed themselves in unique ways and all contributed to the unfolding, all the animals, all the birds, all the rivers and all the mountains. In a way, tribal culture is the most individualistic culture if there was ever one, in the way everyone was allowed to and expected to express themselves with their unique gifts as they listened and paid attention to how others around them (including the birds) were expressing themselves. They knew they were not separate or different or superior to the woodpecker and when the woodpecker knocked, they listened.

  • http://motherboard.vice.com/en_uk/read/we-may-see-a-supercharged-surge-in-warming

    A Major Surge in Atmospheric Warming Is Probably Coming in the Next Five Years

    [begins]

    Forget the so-called ‘pause’ in global warming—new research says we might be in for an era of deeply accelerated heating.

    While the rate of atmospheric warming in recent years has, indeed, slowed due to various natural weather cycles—hence the skeptics’ droning on about “pauses”—global warming, as a whole, has not stopped. Far from it. It’s actually sped up, dramatically, as excess heat has absorbed into the oceans. We’ve only begun to realize the extent of this phenomenon in recent years, after scientists developed new technologies capable of measuring ocean temperatures with a depth and precision that was previously lacking.

    In 2011, a paper in Geophysical Research Letters tallied up the total warming data from land, air, ice, and the oceans. In 2012, the lead author of that study, oceanographer John Church, updated his research. What Church found was shocking: in recent decades, climate change has been adding on average around 125 trillion Joules of heat energy to the oceans per second.

    How to convey this extraordinary fact? His team came up with an analogy: it was roughly the same amount of energy that would be released by the detonation of two atomic bombs the size dropped on Hiroshima. In other words, these scientists found that anthropogenic climate is warming the oceans at a rate equivalent to around two Hiroshima bombs per second. But as new data came in, the situation has looked worse: over the last 17 years, the rate of warming has doubled to about four bombs per second. In 2013, the rate of warming tripled to become equivalent to 12 Hiroshima bombs every second.

    So not only is warming intensifying, it is also accelerating. By burning fossil fuels, humans are effectively detonating 378 million atomic bombs in the oceans each year—this, along with the ocean’s over-absorption of carbon dioxide, has fuelled ocean acidification, and now threatens the entire marine food chain as well as animals who feed on marine species. Like, er, many humans.

    According to a new paper from a crack team of climate scientists, a key reason that the oceans are absorbing all this heat in recent decades so well (thus masking the extent of global warming by allowing atmospheric average temperatures to heat more slowly), is due to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), an El Nino-like weather pattern that can last anywhere between 15-30 years.

    [further down, conclusion]

    Roberts and his team found that a “slow down” period is usually (60 percent of the time) followed by rapid warming at twice the background rate for at least five years, and potentially longer. And mostly, this warming would be concentrated in the Arctic, a region where temperatures are already higher than the global average, and which is widely recognized to be a barometer of the health of the global climate due to how Arctic changes dramatically alter trends elsewhere. Recent extreme weather events around the world have been attributed to the melting Arctic ice sheets and the impact on ocean circulations and jet streams.

    What this means, if the UK Met Office is right, is that we probably have five years (likely less) before we witness a supercharged surge of rapid global warming that could last a decade, further destabilizing the climate system in deeply unpredictable ways.

  • Satish,

    Ohhhhhh, that was good, sort of bomb-shelly.

  • ““Attachment occurs as an innate and primary motivating force with all healthy humans” this view, based on natural science, unfortunately clashes with Robin Datta’s and some other’s religious/philosophical views regarding an alleged undesirability of attachment.”

    Science operates within the realm of spacetime. It includes no aspect of actual conscious awareness. If anyone doubts this, let them prove, including bui not limited to, the Turing test, that there is even a single conscious being. The clash, arises from the attempt to infuse consiousness into the meat robot.

    Let those who consider attachment undesirable quit eating, drinking and breatning.

    “Indeed, it directly contradicts some of those fundamental beliefs.”

    Once one realises that there is no “I”, there is also no “not-I”. And then only place that spirituality is to be found is in bottles.

    “My emotions tend strongly to drive me to place my faith for gaining the most reliable knowledge about how the universe most likely works in the open processes of natural science, not in the self-contained, closed, cognitive processes of philosophy and/or religion.”

    First, whose emotions are they? The insentient meat-robots’. Anyone with a scientific proclvity should strive to prove otherwise.

    These, for the most part in my opinion, amount to an infinite regress of words, about words, about words with little or no reliable comparisons with supporting or non-supporting evidence from the world outside of our heads.

    Intellection leads to the infinite rergress of “awareness of” “awareness of”. To grok “awareness” bereft of all “ofs” is the recognition that the world is pointless.

    I do not think in either all-or-none terms, nor in terms of certainties, regarding these things, but instead in terms of continua and probabilities. With this infinite-scale and probabilistic thinking, it seems far, far more likely than not to me that (1) we humans will find ourselves either extinct, or very near extinction, well before 2050, and (2) that the processes of natural science produce much more reliable knowledge about how humans in particular, and the universe in general, work than philosophy and religion do. These just remain my highly fallible, emotionally driven, ultimately faith-based opinions. I remain massively ignorant and surely have many things not just wrong, but dramatically wrong.”

    There is one discontinuity that cannot be averted: the “I” and the “think”er in “I do not think”. Overlooked sine qua nons, hidden in plain sight.

    Hence the Sufi story from an age wnen books had to be copied by hand, and each book cost a small fortune. A Sheikh’s (realised Sufi’s) assistant was transporting a load of the Skeikh’s books that the Sufi had read, on the back of a donkey from one location to another. Another bystanding Skeikh remarked that the difference between the SheKh who had read and grokked the books and his assistant who had merely read the books, was many orders of magnitude greater than the difference between the assistant and the donkey.

    Before any consideration of beliefs, the first axiom is the existence of a believer. Ignoring the believer is guaranteed incompleteness. Setting up an intellectual dummy/scarecrow as the believer in which that dummy is made of dead trees and pigments is no substitute for a believer; not even a representation on miscellaneous e-readers.

    Failure to distinguish between the aware and the unaware, between the sentient and the insentient, will result in muddled thinking and idiocy that will for ever beggar description.

  • 25 feet is the average length of the human intestine. Multiply that by 7 billion and divide by 5280 and you get 33,143,939 MILES of cleverly activated guts sucking up everything in sight!

  • Kirk, that is a lot of intestines “sucking up everything in sight.”

    Memba Gen. Jack D. Ripper & the precious bodily fluids?

    Engels’ eulogy at Marx’s graveside is instructive, especially to a scientific materialist.

    Engels words are so rudimentary, material, & physical.

    Cognitive idealists claim the reverse – that the “all causative ideas come first.”

    “Just as Darwin discovered the law of development of organic nature, so Marx discovered the law of development of human history: the simple fact, hitherto concealed by an overgrowth of ideology, that mankind must first of all eat, drink, have shelter and clothing, before it can pursue politics, science, art, religion, etc.; that therefore the production of the immediate material means of subsistence and consequently the degree of economic development attained by a given people or during a given epoch form the foundation upon which the state institutions, the legal conceptions, art, and even the ideas on religion, of the people concerned have been evolved, and in the light of which they must, therefore, be explained, instead of vice versa, as had hitherto been the case.”

  • WOW!!! Just discovered and received, through CounterPunch, a book called: “In the Shadow of the Sabertooth” by Doug Peacock.

    “This book is the story of those human migrations into the Americas, beginning with the ephemeral ice-age people at the peak of the glaciation, to the bold mariners who no doubt traveled the northwest coast during the times of the icebergs and finally with Clovis and the extinction of the megafauna.”

    Doug Peacock inspires me with this quote. “This story stands in opposition to the history lesson I was taught in school – the pap of pilgrims conquering a dark and foreboding wilderness, of subduing godless savages with disease and blunderbusses, of Mayflower and Manifest Destiny.”

    I believe and hope my ancestry includes either Cherokee or Creek Indians that were prevalent in this part of country. My grandfather’s photos look Native American to me but no one in my family EVER discussed his family or where he came from. Was it prejudice? Probably, for sure. What a shame. To have the blood of Native Americans is worth more, as the Hank Williams song goes, than silver or gold

    As I read I will try to report more Mr Peacock’s book?

  • See here a 5-minute video and text of the critical role of peer pressure and how to overcome it—directly relevant to much discussion that has occurred here at NBL in the past: http://www.crucialskills.com/2015/03/one-simple-skill-to-overcome-peer-pressure/?elqTrackId=4e224ac95af44e74892829fceeb2666b&elqaid=3122&elqat=1 .

    Read here a book review by Richard Reese (author of What Is Sustainable) of the book Megafauna — First Victims of the Human-caused Extinction, also directly relevant to much discussion that has occurred here at NBL: http://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox/14be476b9fe17dc3 .

    And a question—NOT motivated by anything that has recently transpired here at NBL—just something I wonder about: Why do so many people get so angry when other people question, challenge, or disagree with their favorite beliefs?

  • Thanks Ed 😉
    One can spend a lifetime reading beautiful texts and deciphering sutras. Equally one could spend a lifetime engaged in spiritual practice.
    But in the end one has to look for oneself at what is real (if you would be finished with suffering-and finished with spiritual practice!). So why not do this right at the beginning?
    Again I say this is far easier to do than it is to say anything meaningful in regard.
    But it is for anyone to do- not the chosen few or those who would engage a lifetime of practice.

    And what is real?
    Well YOU of course!
    You are here-undeniably.
    What is it makes that impossible to deny?
    What is that certainty that you ARE?
    Look at it directly just for a second.
    Anyone can do this.
    Simple. Simple. Simple.
    I remember hearing a talk with Chogyam Trungpa years ago at the start of which he said (and I paraphrase) : if there is any among you here this evening that have no previous spiritual understanding then I strongly advise you to leave immediately!

    (Don’t go there)

  • Tom Says:
    March 4th, 2015 at 4:41 am

    A Major Surge in Atmospheric Warming Is Probably Coming in the Next Five Years

    ==============================
    Incredible about the equivalent of 4 nukes a second.

    Jim Hansen used that analogy in one of his TED talks.

    It gets the point across very well.

  • ed, satish, tom:

    Very impressive information. Thanks. I really can see a heat surge coming, since it get’s subtly warmer each winter. Not warm enough not to be uncomfortable with frequent cold, but warm enough for concern if you’re looking hard, and visiting sites like NBL.

  • This just in about a pathetic, merciless, idiotic, me, me, me country.

    Obama is crowing about the sending of 2800 troops to fight ebola in Africa with 4 hours of training. Like the USA was leading the charge and everyone else was following? WTF!

    Oh sure, “America” set up a 25 bed medical unit for a country that had 10,000 cases of ebola. WTF!

    “Obama says the “American values” displayed “matter to the world.” They are an example of “what makes us exceptional.” WTF!

    Now, he says, that the USA has led the way and there is nothing left for us to do. No kidding. Now we learn “the troops” saved no one.

    CUBA on the other hand has saved about 260 with their “Army of White Robes”.

    http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/03/03/two-different-approaches-in-fighting-ebola/.

    Meanwhile, at home, Dr Oz is crowing and gushing about how Christy Brinkley (61 Y.O.) still looks 21. WTF! That’s real important!

    This god forsaken place …!

    It is, us, who have single handedly ruined the whole fucking world.

  • Regarding the question I asked earlier, “Why do so many people so often get so angry when other people question, challenge, or disagree with their favorite beliefs?” I just read the following paragraph in the Preface to Peggy Reeves Sanday’s book titled “Female Power and Male Dominance, On the origins of sexual inequality” (1981):

    “The realization of the inadequacies in my initial conception was accompanied by the discovery that symbolism played a key role in channeling secular power roles. Preliminary analysis of the data indicated that sacred symbols are not, as I had originally supposed, an epiphenomenon of secular power roles. In fact, it became clear that the reverse was more likely: Secular power roles are derived from ancient concepts of sacred power.”

    This suggests to me one important probable answer to the question:

    Challenging beliefs challenges power(!), and most people, most of the time, wish strongly to maintain whatever sense of personal and/or group power that they have. Thus they often respond defensively with great emotional passion, anger, and/or rage—sometimes including verbal or even physical violence—when someone challenges their favorite beliefs. Other reasons surely also exist, but this seems like one plausible and important one to me.

    A little more regarding attachment theory; we can briefly describe it as:
    *A systemic theory that focuses on patterns of human interactions and their impact.
    *A theory of emotion regulation.
    *A theory of trauma: the trauma of isolation.
    *A constructivist theory that focuses on the construction of inner and interpersonal attachment realities.
    *A theory of how, as adults, we inevitably project the wounds of childhood onto our relationships.
    *The most comprehensive and well-researched theory of love.

    In supporting others emotionally and socially regarding the near certain NTHE, attachment theory offers:
    *A language, a frame, a way of making sense of the intense emotional drama of relationship distress, which will become ever more common and intense.
    *A guide through many content issues and secondary reactions to the deep emotional longings, needs, and fears—the music of the dance of love among ourselves, with other species, and with Earth—longings, needs, and fears that will become ever more prominent as social and ecological collapse continue to unfold.
    *A compass in the territory of love, directing people supporting one another to pivotal defining moments and moves.
    *A vision that tells mutual support participants what to target, what will make a difference, what steps to take on the route from distress to secure connection, to effective fear and anxiety management, and to a sense of joy and peace through horrific social and ecological collapse toward death.

  • shep,

    “Meanwhile, at home, Dr Oz is crowing and gushing about how Christy Brinkley (61 Y.O.) still looks 21. WTF! That’s real important!”

    I was appalled at seeing one of Dr. Oz’s articles a few years back. It was titled “What to eat now“. What to eat now? They say mainstream publications these days use language that can be understood by 3rd graders, presumably because the average reading skill of the population is somewhere around that level. It makes sense not only because English is not the first language of many immigrants but also because the general population’s reading skills seem to have gone downhill over the last few decades. But a title like “what to eat now” is downright condescending. Here’s the expert Dr. Oz telling us imbeciles what to eat now. And because it does change from time to time, that “now” is important. “Stay tuned and we will tell you what to eat next month, and be sure to stay tuned when we tell you what to drink, what to do and how to think.”

  • @Shep

    You couldn’t have stated it any better. The USA has it’s priorities out of whack and has done so for a long time. People are more interested in watching “Ellen” and “Dancing with the Stars” than being well-read and informed of issues that affect our well being and that of the global community. We deserve what we get. Let’s wipe the slate clean. I can only hope we don’t take all other living creatures with us.

  • @Satish, v. good comment. I have always wondered about that in Buddhism, which appears to be so “self-effacing”.

  • Lidia, a bit more context is presented in my blog post here.

  • 2 points

    the woody woodpecker meditation retreat LOL. My wife told me of an eco-retreat on an island where people use coolers because there are no fridges. The racoons are a pest, so the owner traps and drowns them.

    You guys love to carry on about Buddha and stuff, i don’t care but, I watched “Wildest India” on netflix about how Hindus live and rely on animals in the Thar Desert, so they have a huge respect for animal life. One town there is dedicated to monkeys, another town is dedicated to rats another to birds etc.

  • I note from the Green Resistance presentation the well worn meme that, “the indigenous people are the only humans living sustainably.” While this may be true for some tribes, there are plenty of other tribal groups whose definition of heaven is a Toyota pick-up, shotgun, and 24″ chain saw. The groups I have personally witnessed are just as vested in the luxuries of modernity as anybody else. Further, I am amazed by their complete lack of concern for the natural world. The reservation sites I have visited are denuded of trees and every square inch is dedicated to modern agriculture; however, when rich Western hippies appear or the pols from Bogota appear bearing gifts of land and cash, the traditional clothing is quickly donned and on goes the dog and pony show replete with tribal dances and shamans. This observation demonstrates that the construct of “good guys” and “bad guys” is complete BS.

  • Robert Scribbler adds an update to the topic of my post yesterday

    https://robertscribbler.com/2015/03/04/2015-el-nino-to-bring-back-to-back-hottest-years-on-record/

    2015 El Nino to Bring Back-to-Back Hottest Years on Record?

    [begins]

    For the past six months, the Pacific Ocean has been very, very warm. A vast and unsettling expanse of record heat building from the tropics on through the mid lattitudes and into the Arctic.

    Sea surface temperatures across a broad swath of ocean from the equator on north and eastward have consistently measured between 0.5 and 5 degrees Celsius above average. A lazy reverse C pattern of heat stretching from the equator running up along the west coast of North America and then re-curving westward just south of the polar zone.

    It is a pattern that is indicative of a well developed positive phase Pacific Decadal Oscillation. A kind of pattern that results in very warm sea surface temperatures for much of the Pacific. And a pattern that tends to favor the formation of El Nino.

    As of December 2014, PDO values had climbed to their highest on record. And with these high sea surface temperature values related to PDO, the Pacific also seemed to be quietly settling into what, at first, appeared to be a mild El Nino. [read the rest]

    from Desdemona Despair today:

    http://www.desdemonadespair.net/2015/03/in-high-carbon-dioxide-world-canopy.html

    In a high-carbon dioxide world, canopy damage from insects limits forest growth – ‘This is the first time, at this scale, that insects have been shown to compromise the ability of forests to take up carbon dioxide’

    [begins]

    In a high carbon dioxide world, the trees would come out ahead. Except for the munching bugs.

    A new study published today [Monday, March 2, 2015] in Nature Plants shows that hungry, plant-eating insects may limit the ability of forests to take up elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, reducing their capacity to slow human-driven climate change.

    The finding is significant because climate change models typically fail to consider changes in the activities of insects in the ecosystem, says Richard Lindroth, a professor of ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the leader of the study. The research suggests it’s time to add insects to the models. [read more if interested]

  • by Spencer Cathcart

    At this moment you could be anywhere, doing anything. Instead you sit alone before a screen. So what’s stopping us from doing what we want? Being where we want to be?

    Each day we wake up in the same room and follow the same path, to live the same day as yesterday. Yet at one time each day was a new adventure. Along the way something changed. Before our days were timeless, now our days are scheduled.

    Is this what it means to be grown up? To be free? But are we really free?

    Food, water, land.

    The very elements we need to survive are owned by corporations. There’s no food for us on trees, no freshwater in streams, no land to build a home. If you try and take what the Earth provides you’ll be locked away. So we obey their rules.

    We discover the world through a textbook. For years we sit and regurgitate what we’re told. Tested and graded like subjects in a lab. Raised not to make a difference in this world, raised to be no different. Smart enough to do our job but not to question why we do it. So we work and work, left with no time to live the life we work for. Until a day comes when we are too old to do our job. It is here we are left to die. Our children take our place in the game.

    To us our path is unique, but together we are nothing more than fuel. The fuel that powers the elite. The elite who hide behind the logos of corporations. This is their world. And their most valuable resource is not in the ground. It is us.

    We build their cities, we run their machines, we fight their wars. After all, money isn’t what drives them. It’s power. Money is simply the tool they use to control us. Worthless pieces of paper we depend on to feed us, move us, entertain us.

    They gave us money and in return we gave them the world. Where there were trees that cleaned our air are now factories that poison it. Where there was water to drink, is toxic waste that stinks. Where animals ran free, are factory farms where they are born and slaughtered endlessly for our satisfaction. Over a billion people are starving, despite us having enough food for everybody. Where does it all go? 70% of the grain we grow is fed to fatten the animals you eat for dinner. Why help the starving? You can’t profit off them.

    We are like a plague sweeping the earth, tearing apart the very environment that allows us to live. We see everything as something to be sold, as an object to be owned. But what happens when we have polluted the last river? Poisoned the last breath of air? Have no oil for the trucks that bring us our food? When will we realize money can’t be eaten, that it has no value?

    We aren’t destroying the planet. We are destroying all life on it. Every year thousands of species go extinct. And time is running out before we’re next. If you live in America there’s a 41% chance you’ll get cancer. Heart disease will kill one out of three Americans. We take prescription drugs to deal with these problems, but medical care is the third leading cause of death behind cancer and heart disease. We’re told everything can be solved by throwing money at scientists so they can discover a pill to make our problems go away. But the drug companies and cancer societies rely on our suffering to make a profit. We think we’re running for a cure, but really we’re running away from the cause. Our body is a product of what we consume and the food we eat is designed purely for profit. We fill ourselves with toxic chemicals. The bodies of animals infested with drugs and diseases. But we don’t see this. The small group of corporations that own the media don’t want us to. Surrounding us with a fantasy we’re told is reality.

    It’s funny to think humans once thought the earth was the center of the universe. But then again, now we see ourselves as the center of the planet. We point to our technology and say we’re the smartest. But do computers, cars, and factories really illustrate how intelligent we are? Or do they show how lazy we’ve become. We put this “civilized” mask on. But when you strip that away what are we?

    How quickly we forget only within past hundred years did we allow women to vote; allow blacks to live as equals. We act as if we are all-knowing beings, yet there is much we fail to see. We walk down the street ignoring all the little things. The eyes who stare. The stories they share. Seeing everything as a background to ‘me’.

    Perhaps we fear we’re not alone. That we are a part of a much bigger picture. But we fail to make the connection. We’re okay killing pigs, cows, chickens, strangers from foreign lands. But not our neighbours, not our dogs, our cats, those we have come to love and understand. We call other creatures stupid yet we point to them to justify our actions. But does killing simply because we can, because we always have, make it right? Or does it show how little we’ve learned. That we continue to act out of primal aggression rather than thought and compassion.

    One day, this sensation we call life will leave us. Our bodies will rot, our valuables recollected. Yesterday’s actions all that remain. Death constantly surrounds us, still it seems so distant from our everyday reality. We live in a world on the verge of collapse. The wars of tomorrow will have no winners. For violence will never be the answer; it will destroy every possible solution.

    If we all look at our innermost desire, we will see our dreams are not so different. We share a common goal. Happiness. We tear the world apart looking for joy, without ever looking within ourselves. Many of the happiest people are those who own the least. But are we really so happy with our iPhones, our big houses, our fancy cars?

    We’ve become disconnected. Idolizing people we’ve never met. We witness the extraordinary on screens but ordinary everywhere else. We wait for someone to bring change without ever thinking of changing ourselves.

    Presidential elections might as well be a coin toss. It’s two sides of the same coin. We choose which face we want and the illusion of choice, of change is created. But the world remains the same. We fail to realize the politicians don’t serve us; they serve those who fund them into power.

    We need leaders, not politicians. But in this world of followers, we have forgotten to lead ourselves. Stop waiting for change and be the change you want to see. We didn’t get to this point by sitting on our asses. The human race survived not because we are fastest or the strongest, but because we worked together.

    We have mastered the act of killing. Now let’s master the joy of living.

    This isn’t about saving the planet. The planet will be here whether we are or not. Earth has been around for billions of years, each of us will be lucky to last eighty. We are a flash in time, but our impact is forever.

    I often wished I lived in an age before computers, when we didn’t have screens to distract us.
    But I realize there’s one reason why this is the only time I want to be alive. Because here today, we have an opportunity we never had before. The internet gives us the power to share a message and unite millions around the world. While we still can we must use our screens to bring us together, rather than farther apart.

    For better or worse, our generation will determine the future of life on this planet. We can either continue to serve this system of destruction until no memory of our existence remains. Or we can wake up. Realize we aren’t evolving upwards, but rather falling down…we just have screens in our faces so we don’t see where we’re heading.

    This present moment is what every step, every breath and every death has led to. We are the faces of all who came before us. And now it is our turn. You can choose to carve your own path or follow the road countless others have already taken.

    Life is not a movie. The script isn’t already written. We are the writers.

    This is Your Story, Their Story, Our Story.

  • Thanks! Friedrick Kling and for what you did last month for Dr. Guy McPherson

  • we absolutely have to legalize drugs birth control and suicide.
    civilization will fall before we will, and these are the easy things.

  • [interesting, but .. ]

    http://phys.org/news/2015-03-material-captures-carbon-dioxide-high.html

    New material captures carbon dioxide with high capacity

    [and, just another take on 9-11]

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2015/03/04/the-saudi-king-gave-a-prize-to-an-islamic-scholar-who-says-911-was-an-inside-job/

    The Saudi king gave a prize to an Islamic scholar who says 9/11 was an ‘inside job’

  • @ FriedrichKling Says:
    March 5th, 2015 at 5:09 am

    Thank you very much, sir, for that wonderful transcript! More thanks, too, and kudos to Spencer Cathcart for creating that message which is more poignant and eloquent than the meager efforts in kind I have made.

    For convenience…

    Spencer Cathcart’s Blog

    …and directly to the superb video…

    The Lie We Live

  • Has anyone read the book “Escape from Evil” by Ernest Becker? It has powerful insights closely related to the interests of this group. It’s going on my Short Shelf of Really Important Books, alongside Catton et al.

  • A few headlines in the alternative news about black and brown inequality in America that has gone unabated and unequaled for centuries, besides our track record of indiscriminate killing of all living things, mostly civilian! Propaganda in America is devastating and cruel beyond any imagination.

    3-5-2015

    “Eric Holder and Barack Obama have shown themselves incapable of delivering elementary justice to Black people.”

    “It was easy for Israel’s Benjamin Netanyahu to emasculate Barack Obama on Capitol Hill. All he had to do was expand on the lies that both Israel and the U.S. tell about Iran – lies that Barack Obama cannot effectively rebut without exposing himself as… a liar. Since neither co-conspirator can rat out the other, the smaller party gains an advantage over the larger one. The most brazen liar wins, and the loser cannot complain.”

    “The author, a noted whistleblower and activist, recently returned from a trip to Cuba, where she engaged in an intensive dialogue with Manolo De Los Santos, a Dominican American studying in Cuba. De Los Santos said Cuba has made great progress in uplifting its people and reversing centuries of slavery and racism. “People need to come to Cuba to see it for themselves.””

    “Black chattel slavery made the United States an economic powerhouse and a beacon to European immigrants. “By 1836 nearly half the nation’s economic activity derived directly and indirectly from the roughly 1 million Black slaves. The descendants of that cauldron of torture and death deserve “a massive federal program of reparations in partial and belated compensation for the massive horror and theft.”

    “If Malcolm X had survived to the present day, the U.S. secret police would have to assassinate him, again. “Malcolm would have condemned imperialism’s endless wars in Africa, Asia, and Latin America and continued to build alliances with the victims of imperialism abroad.” The survival of humanity “depends on a radical movement that can revive Malcolm’s revolutionary spirit.”

    “In a rare instance of a Los Angeles police officer actually being tried for the brutal beating of a black woman in 2012, the state’s so-called “Peace Officer Bill of Rights” is a once again significant barrier to revealing the histories of abuse on the part of the cops involved. Federal legislation guaranteeing cops similar immunities nationwide were introduced repeatedly by Vice President Joe Biden when he was in the US Senate.”

    “Attorney Flint Taylor connects the Homan Square ‘black site’ story to a larger history of secrecy, violence and abuse that spans decades, continents and wars. Flint was quoted in the much talked-about, Spencer Ackerman article The disappeared: Chicago police detain Americans at abuse-laden ‘black site’ at the Guardian”

    “Rev. Edward Pinkney, the Benton Harbor, Michigan, activist who was sentenced to 2 ½ to 10 years in prison for allegedly tampering with an elections petition, said judges and prosecutors must be made to answer for their crimes against Black people. “In Berrien County, they have one job: to send every single Black person to prison,” said Pinkney, now housed at the state prison in Marquette. “In the Sixties, it was called Negro Removal. In Bosnia, it was called ethnic cleansing.” Pinkney incurred the wrath of police and prosecutors when he resisted the Whirlpool Corporation’s gentrification efforts in mostly Black Benton Harbor.”

  • Mr. Kling, I don’t know about South America, but in North America, in the lower 48 states, close to 100% of all living people were slaughtered in an ongoing genocide.

    If any of them have pickups or western trappings, I strongly suggest that any newcomers to this hemisphere, particularly those in the U.S., fix this culture and focus on the 99% of the population that actually has caused the genocide of them and the rest of the planet. Continuing to point out flaws of Native American individuals and suggest they are representative of the cultures as a whole, is a false equivalency.

    Their cultures were sustainable. It wasn’t good enough for this culture. Nothing ever has been. I recall your comment as to how proud you are of being German, and how the Holocaust was “an unfortunate incident,” or something along those lines.

    The genocide here was not “an unfortunate incident.” It was a monstrous evil. You aren’t qualified to judge these things, it’s clear. At least not with any moral substance.

  • ogf, I am a proud German.

    I have no hesitation to be proud of my German heritage & the true history of Germany.

    I am proud of be a part of true German history, the German Volk, Gottfreid Herder, Max Planck, Adolph Hitler, National Socialism, & Germanic culture.

    I refuse to knell before the fraudulent propaganda of the Zionist engineered & orchestrated Holocaust Religion, especially the Holocaust gas chambers/ovens hoax.

    Proud German Sylvia Stolz has recently been sentenced to jail AGAIN by a Munich court for so-called Holocaust “denial.”

    Sylvia Stloz has been jailed for telling the truth about the Holocaust Hoax masquerading as history.

  • “The survival of humanity ‘depends on a radical movement that can revive Malcolm’s revolutionary spirit.'”

    Sadly, very few of us realize this.

  • I’ve posted anew, including video and still photography. Catch it here.

  • oldgrowthforest Says:
    March 5th, 2015 at 9:53 am

    Mr. Kling, I don’t know about South America …
    ===================================
    A lost civilization was recently found there.

    To go along with others found previously (Maya, Toltec, etc.).

    Civilizations most often kill themselves, but like those you mention, sometimes they are murdered (Civilization Is Now On Suicide Watch – 8).

    About the only thing we know about it is that Nature Batted Last, and placed a blanket of flora and fauna over it.

    For centuries now, until it was found by listening to the legends of a “White City” (“The White City” a.k.a. ancient Ferguson).

  • Spezio – you actually make Netanyahu look sane. that’s quite an achievement.

  • Satish: good point about Buddhism and individualism, i.e. salvation seen as an individual thing. IMO, ageless psychedelic ceremonies, engaged in by people for millennia, in all parts of the world, still engaged in by indigenous peoples in various places, especially Asia, Africa and the Americas, are far more about seeing and cementing connection between people and between humans and the world around them.

    Tom Says:
    March 4th, 2015 at 4:41 am
    “http://motherboard.vice.com/en_uk/read/we-may-see-a-supercharged-surge-in-warming

    A Major Surge in Atmospheric Warming Is Probably Coming in the Next Five Years ”

    For my money, the article Scribbler posted on 2/26 about this topic was much better.
    https://robertscribbler.com/2015/02/26/bad-climate-outcomes-atmospheric-warming-to-ramp-up-as-pdo-swings-strongly-positive/

    And a later post by you:
    “[and, just another take on 9-11]

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2015/03/04/the-saudi-king-gave-a-prize-to-an-islamic-scholar-who-says-911-was-an-inside-job/

    The Saudi king gave a prize to an Islamic scholar who says 9/11 was an ‘inside job’”

    And i suppose the WsPo would want its readers to regard this as a reason to scorn those who say 9/11 was an inside job. Yes, forget all the laws of physics and the physical evidence, anyone who says “inside job” is crazy. By the way, at the AE911 Truth site, a good new article about 60 structural engineers who completely demolish the official story regarding the 3 WTC towers.

  • Well, Gerald, if you can pull that off, what can I say? Americans don’t like to acknowledge what happened here, either. It doesn’t reflect well on them, to be euphemistic.

    I’ve been to Dachau, in 1972. An uncle of mine through marriage escaped Nazi Germany and came to the US when he was 17. I spent time with his family in Berlin and England, where they told me stories of how they lived during the war. They were secular Jews, Einsteins and Warburgs. I toured Dachau with my uncle in Munich where we also attended the Olympics.

    I don’t believe for a single tiny nanosecond that the Holocaust was a hoax, and I cannot believe such a statement is even made on this site. What can one possibly say? I can’t think of a thing more. Next we’ll hear that water isn’t wet, or climate change is not manmade.

  • @Satish, thanks for the link. I flipped my sister out one day when I told her that I valued the lizard in my garden more than any person.

    I find the idea of trying to ‘attain’ something (sainthood, enlightenment, a place in heaven) unseemly. I just don’t understand that sort of aspiration and never did… it truly puzzles me. And the dizzying sets of numbered rules and supernatural accounting systems I just find silly. I’m always amazed at how religious schemes maintain their grip on the human mind.


    I think a year or two ago I would have been as scornful as you w/r/t that “What to Eat Now” situation, and while I’m still offended by people who rake in the big bucks with this stuff.. in a way it’s not nonsense: What DO we eat now? On a deeper level people do know this is an important question even if they are lazy, uninformed, etc. They know that they are prey to agribiz and marketers and “scientists” who are telling them one minute that margarine is good for them, now it’s bad for them, GMOs are okay, Roundup is ok to eat. They’ve been so alienated from actual food sources that no wonder they are confused; they have every right to be confused. So, I haven’t read the article in question but the title only makes me feel pity at this point.

  • Eyes cannot see it
    Thinking cannot grasp it
    Yet it is never absent.

    Though always present
    It is not realized.

  • Great video!
    Too bad it seems industrial civilization seems to be a natural process driven by intelligence.
    And the final and complete demise of intelligence seems also to be inevitable.

  • Wow Frank, thanks for sharing that writing by Spencer Cathcart. It does a me a lot of healing inside when I luck on to something like that and take the time to slow down and really appreciate it.

  • Hi Mo Flow & Old Growth Forest-

    Gerald Spazio is not serious except that he desires to insult me so pay no attention to his stupid commentary. Instead he insults himself.

  • Old Growth Forrest-

    Just read your comment. STOP right now attributing commentary to me that I NEVER said. This makes you quite simply a fucking liar and it really angers me.

    I read that oldgrowthforest enjoys fondling children or something along those lines.

  • old growth LIAR-

    YOU OWE ME AN APOLOGY. Otherwise SHOW ME and everyone else reading this blog that I said the holocaust was “an unfortunate incident or something along those lines.”

    There is NOTHING WORSE than a LIAR.

  • Finally old growth forest-

    Your commentary about Native North Americans has ABSOLUTELY NO RELATION to my observations in Colombia, South America. Obviously you are angered by my reporting. In your fanaticism to discredit me you only managed to make yourself appear as a certified LUNATIC.

    I will continue to demand an apology until you are man/woman enough to admit your gross libel.

    Just awhile back I went through this same bullshit with a writer on NBL from Australia whose name escapes me, although he was good enough to apologize to me.

    Friends, I am sorry for going over the two post rule; however, I trust you will appreciate my anger over this affront to my character.

    Why are incidents like this all too common on NBL? On several occasions now I have encountered other commentators like Old Growth Forest fabricating commentary in a desperate attempt to disparage my character.

  • I like you. You’re a realist. You cut to the chase and spread the info (truth). CO2 was the blasting cap and CH4 is the main charge. Painted into a corner comes to mind…